Jimmy Wright

Jimmy Wright
Forename/s: 
Jimmy
Family name: 
Wright
Awards and Honours: 
Work area/craft/role: 
Industry: 
Interview Number: 
123
Interview Date(s): 
15 Jan 1990
9 Feb 1990
Production Media: 
Duration (mins): 
405

Horizontal tabs

Interview
Transcript

×

Transcription Web Portal | Deprecation notice

From Wednesday, 30 September 2020, Speechmatics will no longer be supporting the transcription web portal.

Please see the official Deprecation Notice

Dashboard for john@harwooj.co.uk

You have 168 credits (28 mins)
Top up credits or manage your account.

Buy more credits

Create jobFEEDBACKhelp_outline

1. What do you want to do?

Transcription
Transcribe a media file (speech to text).

Alignment
Get time codes for the dialogue in an existing media file and transcript.

Jobs

Filter by languageFilter by typeFilter by status

refresh

 IDMedia File Created Length Language Type Status Actions

20443732

Jimmy Wright 2 of 7.wav

Aug 30, 2020 12:13:25 PM

00:44:38

en

Transcription

Expired

library_books

20443687

Jimmy Wright 1 of 7.wav

Aug 30, 2020 11:42:21 AM

00:43:57

en

Transcription

Expired

library_books

20402226

Ronnie Noble 4 of 4.wav

Aug 25, 2020 7:07:46 PM

00:09:02

en

Transcription

Expired

library_books

20402077

Ronnie Noble 3 of 4.wav

Aug 25, 2020 6:49:59 PM

00:55:41

en

Transcription

Expired

library_books

20401753

Ronnie Noble 2 0f 4.wav

Aug 25, 2020 6:13:10 PM

00:39:00

en

Transcription

Expired

library_books

Page:

3

Rows per page:

5

11 - 15 of 158

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Terms of Website | Contact Us

© Speechmatics

Job 20443687

Language

en

Created

Aug 30, 2020 11:42:21 AMclose

Transcript

Show Speaker

I'll be right off. This recording is vested in the Ac t t history project. Jimmy Wright documentary and shorts producer recorded on the 15th of January 1990. Interviews Morris Stevenson and Alan Lawson side one. Sorry Marinus. Um tell me what right. Jimmy perhaps you'd like to tell us when you were born and a little bit about your childhood. Well I was born on the 18th of August 1922. Uh the east side of London Manor Park. And. At that time. My father who had been in the Royal Flying Corps during the First World War had gone back into the Royal Air Force because in 1918 the RCC became the Royal Air Force and so at that time my sister was two years old. Joan and we lived with. My grandmother. And it wasn't until father came out of the Royal Air Force I think that was 1928 when talkies started and uh he he wanted to go into the newsreel business which was just being formed and uh I think British movie tone was the company you know that uh. He joined to begin with and then a few years later possibly 1930 31 British Paramount decided to start a newsreel and he joined British paramount. Jimmy can I can I ask what did he joined his own eyes. I think he was uh mainly on the road but whether he was you know endeavouring to to sell newsreels to some of us individually in different parts of the country uh that might well have been. It was a kind of an administrative capacity of when when he left to join Paramount he became general manager so I think as I remember it uh in my school days because we had moved first of all to. Halston because he was he was then based at the School Road North Acton which was nearby and uh when he joined paramount. And then uh we moved out to healing then and that's the place I remember you know much more than I do my early days. I think I was about seven or coming up to eight when we moved to hitting the so I was uh kindergarten school in healing then and I left uh the age of ten because all the boys had to leave. Then I went on to a prep school called Denham Lodge which was uh just on the border of oxygen Denham close to Arthur Kingston remember. Yes well just just opposite Arthur Kingston's house to the lodge. And I was there until uh 15. I should have really left earlier but uh. I don't know how it happened but uh I left 15 and I went to the London Regent Street Polytechnic and I was there until. The war broke out. In September. What were you on the knees any calls. No I was. I was at my ordinary school uh the the school of cinematography was on the top floor and uh often I sort of looked at the sign in a rather longingly and hoped that perhaps one day I'd make it. But of course you know when the war broke out. The uh. Well first I would say that I had two main hobbies in my school days and one was a model airplane and building um. Solid scale models and uh flying models. And uh I had a hankering over flying and perhaps going into the Royal Air Force but I also had this uh uh tremendous interest in photography and uh in nineteen thirty six when I did a cycling holiday just before my 14th birthday uh I bought my first camera in a little town of Bon on the River Rhine one pound thirty of white land a brilliant 445 lens and uh side uh took quite a lot of photographs while I was cycling up the Rhine think we cycled about 500 miles. I did part of the journey back on a river steamer and part by train packed cologne and then by train back to Ostend and across in the vote. And um anyhow uh. When the war started the film industry of course virtually came to a standstill shooting at Cannon. I think they were making the thief of Baghdad then and uh production stopped. The Americans went back to America and uh everyone thought there was gonna be uh bombing and uh. Perhaps even invasion. Anyhow. I got a job. My school was evacuated to Somerset and uh I think my father quite rightly said as a war my son you must do some work. So I had to go and find myself a job. So uh I got a job in uh Lloyds Bank in Uxbridge and uh I stayed there for almost a year and then technicolour at that time. I think we're getting involved in making gunnery training films for the Admiralty and George Gunn who is head of the Canberra department was a near neighbour of ours and friend of a father. Both being involved in film work although in totally different areas of film production. And uh I think George knew that I was very keen. To get into the film business and he had lost three technicians who got into the Royal Air Force and. That's how I compare first jobs John's working in the camera department a Technicolor songstress that was on three strip. Yes. So I had to learn. How to load up 3000 feet of negative and not get it in the wrong order. That's for sure. And also of course unloading and getting it leveled off in the right hands and uh as I got involved in different types of production. Often we had to break down the film perhaps into several sections I might be having a stack of say nine cans with three different tests all going into full. They're all in the dark. Of course total darkness. So I had to be very careful about. Loading and unloading film. It was in the camera department but at that time yes I do indeed. Because in the Cannon department John Marlowe was head of the optical department and we had two brilliant mechanics Bryn Jones and Ron Hill and Doug Haig who had joined in technicolor. I believe from Gilford. Doug was a very experienced technician and he taught me a tremendous amount about. Optics and stop motion photography which of course was what he was very much involved in as he was in charge of making the films on air gunnery training. But there was also Ron Cross and the camera department. He was a technician in charge of the three strip camera and. Just trying to think of the other technicians of course Jack Cardiff and Jeff Unsworth were the two lighting cameramen. And Harold Hazen was the technician that I worked mostly with. And then oh the the most extraordinary break I had within just a week of starting work in the camera department. Was there was a location. At struggling Bay which involved two cameras Jack Cardiff Harold Hazen and myself and on the other camera Freddie and Henty career Penta you may remember I joined the Royal Navy shortly afterwards and was lost in a midget submarine attack on the turf it's suddenly. But uh everyone said my goodness you've got a marvellous break actually going out on location so soon. I mean the training normally I'd take the colour was quite considerable before you actually went out with the camera crew and were entrusted with taking the prisoner masters that. Padded box and handing it to the uh to the technician to uh to rest on the knife edge. Behind the Camera gate the gate because of course there were two two camera Gates does this restrict camera so I had this this marvellous uh break travelling down to switch and uh the whole operation was the um I think it was called the Petroleum warfare board had the bright idea of setting the sea on fire is an anti invasion. Yes device device I tried and the idea was that uh uh they had uh reservoirs of oil up on the cliffs at struggling Bay at intervals there was a pipeline running down the cliffs side across the beach and out into the sea. And then each pipeline uh fanned out like the spokes of the wheel of a part of a cart. And at the end of the spokes a jet of oil would be released and it would come to the surface making a pool of oil and each of the spokes uh the pools of oil would would eventually join up and make a complete pool very large pool of oil and then the pipelines were carefully been carefully calculated how they will be separated along the beach so that eventually each pool of oil joined up and made a uh a wall and they would ignite the oil using carbide floats and eventually as I say the sea would all flare up making this big wall of fire. And uh Freddy young and Henty Crear were in a boat acting as the invaders. Jack Cardiff Harold and I were on the beach filming it from the defensive point of view. I'd say the camera got very very hot and I was a bit worried that the the uh Canada Balsam that held the prison together you know might uh melt. Yes I believe this did happen when before the war when the the camera crew was shooting one of the world window series for Fitzpatrick on the slopes of love for service. I think this actually did happen. This is true yeah it really is. Yes. Carrying on it. Well my. My work has as I say was mainly involved in the beginning with animation work. Sometimes it was cartoon work because Eric Gill the artist set up an animation. Studio where he had a number of artists painting the cells and uh downstairs in the Cannon department we were filming their cartoon work which was all involved in a gunnery training for the Navy. Sometimes we were also shooting model aircraft assimilating attacks by either Japanese. Torpedo and bombing aircraft or the German ones. And uh this was done by. A track was set up in the Cafferty File and in the studio there and the camera was mounted on um for us later. The wheels have been taken off the voice later and uh the whole the lost later could be moved along. At very small distances while we shot the frame at a time stop motion. Tracking into the model of the aircraft the little models were mounted against black velvet they were painted white. And the reason for this was that when the negative was developed the aircraft would become black and although it had little. Markings these swastikas really or the Japanese Uh. So as I write this I tried these could just faintly be seen and we would shoot the sky backgrounds down at Rams gate on the end of the jetty there. And we'd set up the camera so that we had 180 degrees of uninterrupted seascape and with the sky on the sea horizon as we needed it and the clouds were shot in a silver surface mirror which operated horizontally and vertically on two camps and the depending on the attack of the aircraft the cabins were cut accordingly and the person who worked out all the very clever mathematics of how the camera should be shaped to create the. Movements of the aircraft was of course Bernard happy. At Technicolor brilliant mathematician and optical expert and so we we would shoot the sky backgrounds and it's there was the Sky Movement which gave the impression that the aircraft was flying through the air because as I say the air the little model aircraft was static in the center of screen all the time but we were tracking in close to it to give the impression that it was diving towards the ship. That's how we that's how we shot the attacks and these were used in the dome teacher which I believe George Gordon who was head of covert development. I think George and Bernard have you were the creators of the doom. Teacher principal so that the the gunner could set up inside the dome and have complete 360 degrees if he knows if he needed to go all the way around the dome. And these little films would be projected. On the sky backgrounds of the those the I think this is how it was envisaged. And of course the domes were constructed at Technicolor crated up and sent to all parts of the world where there were naval establishments and air gunnery training was in progress then then after then after that what do you do anymore. Oh yes. Oh yes in between times. Excuse me. The British Council had commissioned documentary companies. Several were I think members of the film producers guild and uh Technicolor were employed because of course there were only three three strip cameras in this country at that time and it was the color was purely commercial colour process. So if you wanted to make a film or cinema showing Technicolor was the process to use and. The British Council were financing a series of documentaries featuring main salable products overseas. For instance uh Harris Tweed. Porter Tweed are. Materials made in cotton. The clothing industry and Yorkshire cotton in Lancashire. Class pottery Crown Derby pottery Wedgwood pottery and the idea was that these photos will be shown in North and South America was the idea of boosting the export trade to help pay for the war. Do you ever get to operate a camera at technique. No. Um I was uh. The clapper loader in my earliest days and filling in the report sheets. They were very detailed. I'd take the color you had to. Fill in a full description of the scene. The lens. A distance the camera was when the object. And on the reverse side of the report sheet you had to then fill in a color description of each scene and uh footages were very carefully noted because the cost of making colored prints was very expensive and the producer of the filming color would only very sparingly print up to take color color sections. That. Would have black and white of selected selected takes and uh which we used to shoot what was known as a color pilot at the end of the scene and. One of my jobs was to take the readings front and at 45 degrees on each side to get the camera readings for Jack Cardiff who was the cabinet man that I mostly worked with on location give me when you say you had to do a description a color description of color was there under state guidelines. No no no I was just one zone free interpretation of the colors as as they appeared at the time. Um Jimmy when you were Technicolor was this after you'd been attempted to join the RPF and were rejected on. The grounds of your eyesight. Or was that this was after just a few months after because on my 18th birthday in 1940 I was working at a bank at that time. And. I didn't start working take the for about another two months leading up to months afterwards. Perhaps you'd like to expand on that a bit about wanting to join the RPF. And be discovering that your eyesight was lacking. Well I think you know at that time. As I say the film world had come to a standstill I was fully in time as it were working in the bank. I didn't really enjoy particularly that sort of work because it wasn't what I really set out to do and and several of my friends who were in the. Oxbridge model era club with me and also the number 14. Squadron. A DCC the air defence Cadet Corps. So several of my troubles had already joined the Air Force. Soon after the war broke out and I think I felt well it was I was 18 and now I could go along and join up but it wasn't as simple as that because it was then that I discovered my my sight wasn't good enough. I was a bit short sighted not a lot but enough to be turned down. I think at that time you had to be absolutely spot on. I think perhaps later on in the war maybe the site tests weren't quite too stringent Jimmy give me a can I go back to you you mentioned about Arthur Kingston across the road. Did you ever go across to Arthur at all. Well yes yes I did because he was a great inventor. Oh he was a fantastic person then. My father knew him very well and uh the mill club was just around the corner and uh I've put it all down so it's okay. Arthur and father I often meet in the middle class and talk about Arthur's uh inventions and so forth and uh and also maintained all the newsreel cameras at British paramount. And in fact he he invented this marvelous slow motion camera for my father which would change for normal speed to slow motion almost instantly. I think it was just a loss of perhaps a frame and a half or something very very my Newt. And for newsreel work this was very spectacular. Didn't did he did he did have his workshop in. Did you have a workshop in his garage. Well he had his yes he had his workshop uh in the in the house. They hadn't but later um I think the headmaster of the school. Was called up and. The gymnasium that I used to use when I was at school there was turned into houses workshop. So I. There was an old old building just across the stream street when I ran right through Arthur's house. Uh and and in between our school grounds and uh this building which I don't know whether it was uh a stable beforehand converted into a gymnasium but that became Arthur's workshop. Now. Let's get back to taking place. You've been talking about the British Council commissioning these films. You were involved in those. Yes I uh I worked on several I worked on uh. Uh. One called Harris Tweed which we shot in the Outer Hebrides. Harold Hazen Jack Cardiff myself. Charlie Tester was the sound recordist and uh Don weeks was the assistant. Who drove the through the the the truck the shooting rate that we used as the camera car. And. You know with Technicolor equipment it's pretty bulky and we had a three wheel Dolly. Location one in the back. And. What was known as a lightweight blend because I was shooting this so I could tell you though in the end it was with that with Jack And don and Harold in the car. There's only room for me on the roof so I literally used to travel sitting on the roof of a car. This was great to me in the Hebrides because it was a pleasant countryside no traffic anywhere just single track roads and uh every now and again we'd come to a gate at the end of a huge area and I'd have to slide down off the roof open the gate that the car goes through close the gate and get back on the roof again. And that's how we would drive around. Lewis and Harris visiting the crafters cottages and we had all four whether it was such a shame because. Terry Bishop was the director and Terry had gone out beforehand and uh to suss out the locations and the many matters for the boat. He said Oh marvellous great. The weather's been terrific from the next day on. It rained solidly for about a fortnight and we were confined very much to a little hotel road all of the south end of the islands. But we did sort of knife out and snatch scenes just whenever we could. But the location went on suddenly a bit long as intended and um part of that particular film we had to do a lifeboat sequence because the story was around the Hebrides and lad. The boat had been torpedoed and he was literally steering the boat back to the island again. And every day the director would look out the window and they out seized on raft after they chaps. And eventually. He thought the weather was right and the lifeboat was towed out including a few local seamen. And this young man who was going to do the steering and uh Jack Cardiff Harold and myself we we bolted a top hat to the to the one of the seats in the lifeboat and. We were duly towed out of the sequence but unhappily the tow rope broke and we started to drift and the boat really at one stage we thought we were going on the rocks and it was the camera we were thinking about more than anything the loss of the Technicolor camera seeing as how there are only three of them. You nearly lost one on Western approaches. I believe so I believe sir Farrow Jack was being sick. It was it was a sorry state. Where is that. These fishermen they found a bit of sail in the and the bottom of the boat and they they all had no mast. They were literally holding it up and uh it catches the wind and they and how they brought us in through a little narrow inlet without getting on the rocks. I'll never know because it was very close very close. Well the uh only feature that I worked on in the short time you know that I was to take the colour before I went into the Royal Air Force was the great Mr handle which I think was also ranks first venture into the feature business other than the religious films which he had been making before. And of course the the story of handle was in a sense uh slightly religious. Yeah. Did you ever see is TV film. Yes I did. Yes. Yes. Besides time did you buy you that when we started. I'm just wondering. Well I think I may have seen it in Technicolor. When we when it was finished what a stink. Well frieze green you know it was the cameraman or allegedly the cameraman but Jack Cardiff was keeping it more than holding his hand. I think so. I think so really and truly yes. Anyway so what did you do on that when you were you on the floor. Yes. Harold was uh was operating when he was focusing and I was. He was focusing the actual camera. I was uh learning focusing and I was focusing viewfinder and um I'm tracking shots you know and loading and unloading my first actual break as a technician. It was life and death and kind of. But I only worked right at the very beginning on artists tests and you know some other tests before the actual. Production shooting started because I at that stage I felt I really ought to join join up. I'd lost lost several friends in the RAF and uh. What did you do on those tests with the artists tests with as an operator as a technician I know there was a difference. The uh the I forget who the like to be involved crass interference. No Chris was in the area then because um um Bobby Pascoe showing me the camera I mean might not I'm not sure. I think he was afraid quite impressive. But I'm all right. I think it was going to be Jack Carter's first. Major. Love of feature lighting. I think Jack did light it in the end but as I say I only worked on tests and then went to the into the service. When would that be. This is in May I say. April May 42. The form unit. I'd heard the foam needed to be informed. I think at the end of 41 and that's that's what I wanted to try and do to get into the area foam unit so you would have done basic training first. Yes I had to do that when I joined at Coddington. Like most most of the RAF ground staff did and I went out to Great Yarmouth to do my square bashing. We were living in their ladies houses the been acquisition. They were empty and we did our square bashing up and down the streets on the front. But the all of us and I was there actually when at that time the Jerries were doing what they called the by Decca raid and sort of TIFF and Rowland may. Be the parish church was I think the largest or the oldest in East Anglia and that was their target and they they set fire to the church with incendiaries and then came back and machinegun the firemen. All they were trying to put the blaze out but that was the only attack we had. You know whilst I was in the office then I went to a straight one for. A test before going on to the School of Photography. There were two schools of photography no one was at Farnborough no number a Blackpool. And I was destined for the number two school of black and I spent nearly six months there until December 1942 when I passed out and actually was posted to Pinewood. I never thought I really would be posted the film unit because you you very rarely were posted to your choice of unit. I could have been posted anyway but. I had said that you know I particularly want to go into the film unit as possible and I had some motion picture experience and lo and behold I was first fired. So I have Christmas at home and uh I never went straight over to them. So you're living in the economy then to launch the kind of man hours it was within cycling distance of Pinewood Studios then when did they send you on the gunnery course. I suppose I was about a couple of months also at Pinewood and. The time was spent we had three aircraft based at Benson and Anson Hudson and a Beaufort Flight Lieutenant Haggard was the officer in charge of the film unit aircraft and. These were used for making films. Aircraft recognition films navigational training various training training films that we did and that is where I I learnt. From my experience with using a camera in the air with people like Chris Janice. Dennis and Hala. Gill Taylor he was really he was the film unit and. Harry Waxman was then trying to think of other ways gallium to try it again. He had already gone overseas. Yes he can. In fact when he was here when he was killed I was posted out there to join the desert airforce. Yes I I went to stormy down. I think it was in March 43. To do the gunnery training course and I think it was in part the end of April when I completed the course. I let it stop me. I wanted to know really. Yes sir.

Transcript

Show Speaker

Yes I think it was the end of April. Maybe just the beginning of May. But I guess the big surprise of course at the end of the gunnery course was that I was offered a commission. I hadn't gone on the gunnery course for anything other than two to gain aircrew status because I wanted to join the Operations Unit of the film unit and you can fly on ops and else you had me a crew category and I think it was thought that not only was the air gunnery training course the shortest of all the air training courses but we'd end up being able to shoot a gun instead of shoot with the camera if necessary. And as I said I'd end it ended up by becoming a pilot officer. You didn't save why you were on the commission. One never knows these things like how they were about I suppose I'm trying to see how many of us were on the course. Difficult to think back. Must be it must've been 50 or so US and six of us. Were offered commissions to do rather well. That's what I was told that you the crew. Oh well I can't remember exactly how well I did. I did well. Yeah i i i i love the training. You know I even in the photographic course as well lied. I knew at the end of it it was all going to be of no use to me if I got into the film unit. It was all very interesting and it involved. The overlying. Cameras that we used the automatic cameras of the aircraft and uh and so on and I felt little you know immensely interesting and and also the still photography and processing work it was all all interesting and I enjoyed it. Did you have to do both still photography and cinematography. Well on the on the actual photographic course of flak for it it was all still photography. The automatic cameras processing the enormous long rolls of film that we used in the in the automatic cameras printing huge lengths of film and then doing a bit of identification you know trying to read the photographs although that was a highly specialized job well that's kind of navigation. Well I went really from the point of view of assessing damage after a raid or or identifying targets before a raid. I mean it was mainly W's who were employed at Medina near Marlow. The special unit for identifying I forget the one forgets over the years the actual terminology of Peter their titular work pattern. And then of course we were we were using still cameras it was. It was all interesting. Coming back to find now. Yes I tried to remember other names who actually ask Skeeter Kelly of course was ahead ahead of me if I at least probably a year by the time I overheard was how I joined Jerry how do. You weigh. Terry Holt was or he was away I think yes he was already away. I'm trying to think of Lee Howard Lee. Lee was still on Monday when Lee Lee was on mosquitoes. We had one one mosquito aircraft Squadron Leader Patterson was the first the pilot and you know it was a fixed camera in the nose of the mosquito. And you name it. Yes that's right. You name the aircraft in Lee. Lee switched it on and off and you were very restricted to what you could do from the mosquito through the bombing. It was a panel that was all really very confined space as well. Well was David David Prosser was with you. Was he wave wait. No he was later. He was later. I was paranoid. Pat was the CEO. Yes. Pat was squadron leader then and he was he was CEO of the ops unit. Teddy bad was the wing commander you end up in Whitehall as we learned the twist overall in charge of PR one then take us home from. Let me see how do I. Oh I know. Well I'm coming back as well as a as an officer to the Pinewood um through them. It's Teddy bad. What was to say the least. A little thrown. I doubt he he what he was of a ruddy complexion. Well I don't think I've ever seen him quite so red in the face when I confronted him. And what we've. The words he used. We've known establishment for another officer. I don't know what I'm going to do you know he really was beside himself. He's quite quite funny and I'd hidden on one of the sets when I first arrived at the studio and uh I knew sooner or later I'd be said for uh. Sure enough I was uh and the furrow Teddy he he really didn't know quite what to do so he posted me as swiftly as possible. And Skeeter Kelly drove out with me to meth for a little satellite aerodrome to uh felt well in Norfolk on the borders of Norfolk and Suffolk and uh that's where I joined uh 4 6 4 and 4 8 7 Ventura squadrons 4 4 6 4 was the Australian squadron for its 7 was using the squadron and uh on the way up Skeet broke the news to me that um 4 8 7 squadron had lost 10 out of 11 aircraft the day before over Holland and. Q Have you heard much but uh it was one of those unfortunate incidents when the ranger. What kind of a plane was that. Ventura was a twin engined Lockheed Aircraft. Um conversion of the Hudson which was smaller and uh it was affectionately known as the flying pig I think because it was a pig to fly apparently and uh. It had this belly to allow for the bomb load and slightly swept up fuselage at the back. So that uh a rear gunner could lie flat on the floor and under fire um comes two twin guns. Towards the rear of the aircraft. It had um it was ill defended. That was the only defense it had. And um it had a small Astrodome for navigational purposes and. Navigator and pilot uh wireless operator upfront but we removed the Astrodome and had a wooden shield built and a wooden platform over the main spar of the aircraft which was immediately underneath the Astrodome so that I could stand on the loading platform and I'd just be head and shoulders above the top of the fuselage of the aircraft with the windshield protecting me from the slipstream and I could then have a 180 degrees panoramic view of what was going on in the sky of other aircraft or you know if we were attacked too. And then the. Bomb polymers panel was there at the Gunners panel I should say at the rear of the aircraft was a bullet uh piece of glass you couldn't film through it because the clarity also wasn't good enough. It was very thick and dense and uh they made a special frame with with um a quick release levers and I could turn these levers and with withdrawal the pins and lift the whole. Panel out. It was very very heavy and it only came out easily when the aircraft was one of its sort of downward movements and I could quickly lift it right out and then fall through the open space had a clear clear view and so I'd lean over the edge and balance the human Sinclair camera on the on the frame. I had to make sure that that whilst I was looking through the viewfinder and seeing the target and the problems going down that I'd actually got the lens of the camera which was lower down and. Made sure that was clear of the aircraft. That was it. Did you use this at all or was it always humans only. Very occasionally the eyes were almost entirely I used an even simpler camera single answer. Yes. Do you have any. I could. I could change lenses. Oh yes but I mean they used the 50 mil lens because that. That gave me. You haven't a lot of time to change lenses. And if I was filming other aircraft in the formation we were usually flying in a box what was called box formation in threes. With boxes of six aircraft with a box of six flying slightly below and behind us. Because I nearly always flew in the leading aircraft so that I would be filming not only the our own target being hit by our box of six aircraft but the box of six following behind what what. Other lenses you had presumably Thirty five fifty three. I had the 35 the 50 and 75 those were the only one that is right. Yes yes. But I I use principally the 50 mil really all the time as a double spring clockwork motor. And just about had a running time to complete a bomb run and the bomb bursts before it could quickly wind off again and to get other shots. How many banks did you carry on. I only used to take two to go on a bombing raid because. They were 200 foot schools and I only used usually around 100 to 150 feet of film on any depended on how many other shots I might take. But then that I was confined mainly to depending on the type of aircraft because you see I flew in a lot of aircraft where you could only shoot through the bottom part of the aircraft like Boston normally Baltimore. It was only in the Mitchell where you had a small side window that you could open and film horizontally. You know this was a side venture it was a big exception you know having this special platform and being able to shoot over the top of the aircraft as well as you are. Where was your film processed. It was all processed under guard at ranked laboratories. Well denim labs as it was known as their space then I think the rushes were waist up to the Ministry of Information and the Army Navy and Air Force chiefs used to view the material shot by the three services and decide which could be used for propaganda purposes and which had to be retained either for secrecy points of view for the archives I've seen some film that you shot using the color of King George 6 inspecting your squadron. Yes. Well the the the visit of the king and queen. That was in May I think towards the end of May. It was really because of this tremendous loss of 10 out of 11 aircraft for its seven squadron that when when the squadron was reformed I think it was common practice for the king and queen to visit. Where they've been a major loss to boost morale and like they would visit. A city that had been heavily bombed and see the shuttle. What was this was 16 millimeter on a very simple Codex any special was 50 foot magazines of all of Kodachrome. I mean it was really the simplest possible camera and we were very lucky to get any color at all. I think I only had that probably was all I had at that time and I used it on the royal visit it was a joke. No it was uh it belonged to the film unit. Yes. Yes. Did that use much 16. Very very little. Very little. I think it was only. In the senior special in. Disney in color. And if it is as I said it was very very little of it around I I was allowed to. After I'd been with the French tourist squadrons for I think it was a matter of a couple of months. I was then posted overseas and I took the name Sinclair. Plus the Sydney special and a few magazines of colour. When you say impressive overseas roughly what was that. That was in custody in the beginning of July. I can tell from my logbook if you wanted to accurately turn that for you. He's 43. Oh yes 43. Yes a wee wee. I didn't know where I was. Going at all. I wasn't told. I was just told to get kitted out with tropical Kit Kit and went up to Euston and up to Greenock and boarded the ship. And even when we were in convoy we didn't know where we were going. The convoy went to Philip ville. First of all and our ship most of the of those on board were Army and Army nursing sisters and they. They disembarked at Phillip ville and then the ship turned around and went back to Algiers and I think I was the only one left on it. At that stage and the RPF had a small film unit had mainly moved up to Tunisia to El Moussa and. But there was a PR unit at Algiers that it'll be are up on the hill overlooking the bay and I was there just a few days until. He could fix me up with a flight to Halloween to Tunis. I think I stayed overnight as I slept sitting up in the airport overnight and the next day I went on to Malta to um to join two to three Baltimore squadron was in check who was in charge of the film unit. Well Arthur Taylor was the CEO of the number two film production unit and I think they were actually at Del Mar so at that stage and then I didn't see them at all in Sicily I was with the squadron we moved from Malta to Monte longer on the south coast of Sicily as the fighter boys moved up and the Germans were pushed further north their fuel became fainter we moved into Monte long. And then when the uh the terriers were finally pushed out of Sicily we moved up to GBP which was the airport for Catalonia I was flying I. Was the American 12th bombardment group. In Boston's from Cali and Malta. Bombing targets in northern Sicily and it clear it was with. A Boston Marathon. Boston squadron we were attacking a gun position on the slopes of Mount Bronte and several aircraft were lost in that attack and we got hit. In fact the aircraft bounced and I nearly fell out of this gate because I was filming through the escape hatch. It was a pretty big one on the Boston and it was the first time had flown in Boston and. I didn't realize you know how wide it was. You couldn't stretch your elbows right across the opening. Only over one side of it. And when we got hit some some flak as I say it felt as though the aircraft was being kicked hard. And I had a job to hold myself from falling through the opening. You didn't have your parachute on it. No you couldn't. You see the the crew of an aircraft all where the parachutes on the chest knew you couldn't wear the parachute and a lot of the cameras were there just wasn't room and only the pilot used to wear his parachute all the time and sit on it. He wore a different type of parachute and we had to steer it away somewhere and if we had to get out grab it quickly and clamp down. Was that the time that you had to bail out when you were hit. Not that time. No. That time you know we got back okay. No problem. But no it was later on when I was back with two twos two to three Baltimore squadron and we were then based we'd moved from Sicily to can Bucca Sally at dizzy and we were then. The Germans were then just beyond Naples. On the west side of Italy and where the American Fifth Army were fighting and Monty and the eighth Harvey were pushing up the Adriatic side of Italy and it was the eighth army that we were giving to the three squadron. Desert air force were giving close support. And as far as the army were then. They had advance beyond Fajr. They were off in the fast Fastow area on the Adriatic coast and we were attacking targets just beyond the frontline and it was in October of October the 15th we were attacking an 88 millimeter gun position which the 8th. Harvey we're having a lot of trouble. From. When we ourselves. Were shot down. By the 88 one of its guns and. We lost an engine and a lot of petrol because we were holed in the petrol tanks in the wings and. The aircraft. Momentarily went into a spin the petrol was flowing into the aircraft. I had the escape hatch opened you see because we were on the bomb ran up the time and I had to very quickly shut the escape hatch because the petrol might have ignited it was dripping from the control wires and. I was afraid it might get onto the electrical equipment and spark off a fire. And. But when we started to spend I had to open it again smartly because the by this time the wireless operator had unplugged his intercom and crawled from up mid ships and the aircraft down to where I was I was underneath the. Gun turret. And the wireless operator was ready to jump out. He had a bit more experience than I had and he probably in that sort of situation before. So he was ready to to to bail out and very soon after this the pilot seemed to get control of the aircraft and he gave the command to bail out. And so I signaled to the wireless operator towards the. Course he was unplugged and got his intercom plugged into two pointed to the escape hatch to jump. By this time the gunner was slithering out of his turret and climbed on his parachute. He indicated to me to go next but I hadn't got my parachute on at that stage it was stuck in the flare chute and I'd got the camera. So I signaled to him to go and grab my parachute planted on went to. I said to the pilot you know that I was I was going because until the pilot was totally separated from us at the front and until we had signals that we had bailed out he couldn't bail out because the navigator was in front of him in the nose. So he knew and the navigator had gone but he didn't know when we were gone so I said Well I'm just just going now and clamped on the chute went to field for the record and it was no cord there what I I'd done in a hurry I put it on upside down and the reporters on the left side but you couldn't change once it was clamped on you couldn't get it off. That was the whole idea. They were really very firm fasteners side although you know hope for the best. And I jumped and pulled a Rip cord and I was quite relieved when I heard the at the crack of the chute opening above me and I just looked up and there it was lovely floating away. And to my astonishment I read I could I could see it. We just managed to cross our own lines. I didn't know at the time which side we really were but I could see gunfire. Puffs of smoke and them around and. But I didn't realize that we were so close to the ground. So we must have lost quite a lot of height when the aircraft. Was out of control and it was several years afterwards when I met the pilot again and we talked about the bailout that he actually was unconscious for a while. There was a smell of the hundred octane petrol and his navigator in the nose the the quick release mechanism should have allowed the floor of the aircraft to drop away so that he could just fall out but it got damaged I suppose when the aircraft was hit and he couldn't he wouldn't. And he was kicking and kicking and in the end he had to operate it in the normal way as though he was going down the steps out of the aircraft and put the hatch down and slide out. Well when the air flew in at that stage the pilot must've been revived. Thank goodness for us because we didn't know all this was going on in the back of the aircraft. I suppose we would have you know if it had just gone on out of control we would have jumped for it anyway you know because your parachute was on upside down. Did it affect how you landed or. No it didn't. And I'd seen parachutes. You know when you go through all your training purposes you you you go into the parachute packing shed and you see how they're packed and and so on and and how the strands are stitched to the inside. To the heart back of the of the parachute pack. And they're all going out one particular way. So that is the parachutes put on the right way the strands are all going straight up to the to the parachute itself. So I knew they were being double back on themselves because it was upside down. And that's why I wasn't too sure whether they would hold when the jet and the parachute opened and with my weight on one end and the parachute. I don't mean opening art but it you know that the fastening must be very very strong indeed and didn't make any difference to left the camera behind. But sadly that was my only regret because thinking about it afterwards I might have been able to to wedge it behind. So I actually like it but I might have been able to wedge it behind the waiving of the parachute harness for myself and it might not have slipped out. I was very sorry about that. Did you have much film recorded on that camera that. Was far behind. Oh yes I think I might have got. We had dropped our bombs and we were actually on the bomb island and. I might have got you know some of the target jamming. I mean what kind of a landing did you have that. Well that was what surprised me as I said I looked up and saw the parachute was open and I looked down and the ground was coming up. You know really quite quickly I had no idea that I was as low as that side. I just quickly put my legs together bent my knees and just let myself crumble up as I hit the deck. That's how we'd been taught. I'd never done a parachute jump before. We'd only been practicing in the hangar swinging across and dropping onto onto a mat to assimilate how hard it would be. You know when we hit the deck you were attached to the Eighth Army do you say that particular or you told me you were having trouble with this gun position. Well uh to to three squadron right throughout the North African campaign and these systems Sicily and Italian campaign they're so occupation as one of the squadrons of the first tactical air force was giving close support bombing Patton bombing the German gun positions and their supply columns and so forth. So we were always attacking targets very near to our own front line. That wasn't your father also attached to the wealth father had there before I even joined the Air Force. He was already flying with the 8th Air Force from Basim Vaughn. On a raid over. France Holland Belgium and later in raids into Germany. He was hit. He volunteered to join rejoin the airforce at the outbreak of war to film. And they they didn't want to know. They said he was too old and he must've been only 41 in 1940 because he was born in 1899 but they said no no you're too old and so when the Americans came into the war he volunteered. But he was in Italy wasn't he. Oh late late on yes he he seems to be here 41 42. He was with the 8th Air Force in this country and then in 43 he when the landings in Algeria took place. The was the first and the first time I advanced from Algeria I met up with the ATO in Tunisia. Well he went out to Algeria with the. Condor and joined the flying fortress squadron that was attacking deep penetration into. Sicily and Italy and prior to the Sicily landings. And. Eventually he joined the 5th Army on the ground when they were at. I think the army headquarters was Caserta just north of Naples. And I think that was called the Gothic line with the. They dug in in 1943 for the winter of 43 44 before the advance on Rome. My father was at the Battle of Cassino fulfilling and then went on to to Rome. I got a note here that in autumn 1943 you met Ian Struthers somewhere in Italy. Yes. That was so that was very soon. That was it must have been in October of 43 when we had moved from Sicily to Cannes Pocus Charlie. And. I think I'd done three my first three raids from a camp focus Charlie. And. You know they were all taped up with all the report sheets. We had a special despatch bag labeled up for PR one Whitehall. And it was a question of getting that delivered to someone who was going to be going back to England as soon as possible. And I happened to see a figure I recognised in the shape of that in Struthers in his tropical kit with his war correspondent insignia on the shoulders. Right. When did you know him from. Well I'd met and. Because he he was a newsreel camera earlier with British paramount. And so I think I must've met him. Might have been of Brooklyn's one of the race meetings that I'd been to. I know I had met him and seen him before. So I was quite astonished. I've got some quotes here. When I talk to him and you said Who are you. What's your name and you must know my father. Because he. He said that you approached him. Really. Yes. And then of course he knew. And yes I. Because he was quite a individualistic person you know. I mean I think he had a moustache. He. I don't know any vaguely. Quite a small world. All these cameramen and I keep bumping into each other. He's quite a little dilatory sort of figure was over here. Anyway I said I had this problem was getting as he. Oh no he said that's no problem over there and pointing to a pilot. Had got all his gear ready to jump into the aircraft to go over and have a word with him. That's Lord. Douglas Hamilton. And he's going to be flying over the top back to uh Benson because he's he is he's flown non-stop here on a photo reconnaissance. I think he must have been from Benson and. He actually took my films back. They couldn't have got back more quickly than that because otherwise it might have been. Well if they'd have gone by air they would have gone back to Algiers to Gibraltar and then Gibraltar. How I suppose you had to use quite a lot of initiative and change to get your films back when you were so far afield. Yes it was. It was a question really of locating somebody in Transport Command. I mean often at a CO 2 would fly in with supplies of one sort or another because I mean in the early days of going from Sicily into Italy. Taranto was was mined they couldn't take any ships in there until all mines were cleared so all the supplies for the Army and the airforce were all flown in by Dakotas I mean they were marvelous. They just flew anything and everything in bomb's wheels petrol carry cans of petrol everything. Well that must have been very close to your accident. Yes I had gone. In December. I left the squadron and I went to Naples for a bit of a rest because in the meantime you know I've done quite a lot of ups from Malta from Sicily from Italy including the escape in October when we were shot down and I think the CNO probably thought good I did have a bit of a rest and I went over to the unit and moved them from Giovanni. So from a convent close to Bari on the Adriatic coast they'd moved over to Naples at Vollmer. That was at the top of the Finnish killer railway in Naples and. So I was over in Naples for a little while. Then I was sent to Gibraltar to join the. Catalina flying boat squadrons with Bill Wilbur and the UK with some. Bill and I were attached to the flying boats for a few weeks because by this time the the Germans were beginning to remove the submarines out of the Mediterranean because of the advance of the ROV towards Rome. And the idea was hopefully we would go out on anti submarine patrols with the cat leaners and and get some strikes and we did one or two very long trips Sunday night 20 20 are flights. Out into the Atlantic up the Portuguese coast into the Bay of Biscay and back. But we didn't we didn't get anything unfortunately. So Bill and I. I think we had a signal from Arthur Taylor saying you know catch we've gotta get back to Naples and we were having a drink in a bar and an American Liberty ship captain we got into conversation with him and he said well I'm sailing tonight. Why didn't you come back with me. So we we thought well we're not in any great hurry to get to Naples the way we've still got to somehow get a flight to Algiers and then pick up another flight from Algiers to Naples stocky.

Transcript

Show Speaker

It was lovely. It was in January. Lovely sunny day rolled off her shirt sleeves we were up on deck and then we went down had a lunch trolley had lunch. They were feeding off food fresh food from the fridge not pulling beef and biscuits and the kind of tack we're used to having come out from the States. They got plenty of meat and vegetables and so on in the in the fridge. Well this was all very fine and we was sitting up on on deck just watching the sun disappear into the sea and some little ships started putting a smoke screen around the convoy and we sort of took this as normal practice. In the air in the evening but there sooner had they laid the smoke screen then Jamie radiates appeared through the smoke right down on the sea and they started dropping torpedoes on the. They hit the ship on our port side. I would think just the stern of mid ships and it just disappeared. I've never seen what I know seen a ship go down before I seen a model shot in the studio. We've done that before. But to see it go down and nobody had a chance to get off was really quite horrifying and it just didn't seem real at all. Well the next thing there was a hell of a big bang and the ship heaved up and the nose went down into the water. We had got a hit ourselves up front and. We were rushed for our life jackets and ready to take on the lifeboats or jump over the side whichever we had the chance to do and the ship didn't actually disappear it went down with the nose into the water and settled and. We were taken off by. Little rescue ships which were among the convoy. They'd be doing the smoke laying low before. So we had time to get off and take our camera equipment and. Eventually we were taken ashore it all ran and Bill and I thought well person safe to fly back the rest of the way. Well that's what we did. We went again. You didn't manage to get any pictures of that because you were. It all happened so fast now. It was very unfortunate from that point of view. I mean the last thing we expected was attack at that stage in the war to to be attacked right round the southernmost corner of Spain. I mean had we been up in the Mediterranean nearer Italy that would have been a different matter. But these aircraft. Must have taken off from an airfield in the south of France. I think we discovered afterwards that it was Montpellier. And. You know they had flown some some considerable distance for the type of air twin engine aircraft in those in those days. And they were they must have gone out over the Algerian or as close to the Algerian coast turned and attacked us from the most. Unexpected area as well. And they were so low that it was difficult for the ships to shoot out them without hitting our own ships to sea because either they were right down so low as they came across the convoy they were then beginning to climb up and away. But. The gunners must have had difficulty you know for hitting the other ships. So when you put a short Iran where did you go from there. We flew to Naples during and then we had to lift into Dakota taking supplies to Naples. So it was you know very soon after that I I went to Corsica where we were flown over. I went on my own on that trip that we had an aircraft. Attached to the film unit for transport purposes. And I was flown over two years of that here on the east coast of Corsica where there was. An American Mitchell squadron and set number of air Cobra fighters for protection put a detachment of four marauders from Number 14 squadron which was based at bleeder just outside Algiers. So there were four aircraft. That bleeder for Corsica and for that Taranto critically. And these aircraft completely covered the whole of the western Mediterranean for low level reconnaissance activities. They had had the bomb bays. Converted into long range petrol tanks. So the aircraft from Corsica could fly all up the coast of Italy. From. Just south of Rome. Right up. Along the southern coast of France and spy out the coastal travel and coastal vessels. Or submarines or any hostile enemy any ship radio back and the petrol bombers would go out and they were fitted with a heavy gun in the nose of the eye of the aircraft. And so they could go in low level and fire shells at the coastal ships and sink them that way. And with some fighter try to cover if necessary. So I was in Corsica for a short while and then I went to. Back to Naples and that's where I met Father and we had a little celebration. So he gave me a very nice watch. My 21st birthday which had I'd spent in Sicily Monte longer under canvas in a cotton field where we were we were. Using us which we were using a spare bedroom and so we had a few jugs there and then I went back to Naples and then went down to grotesquely to to rent her to join the other detachment of marauders. To complete the assignment off. It was the only squadron of marauders in the Royal Air Force so that was the reason why I was and I had done one one reconnaissance trip with up to the Adriatic to try SDP and polar and then down the Dalmatian Coast among the islands down to the Greek islands to Piraeus and then back to Toronto and done some filming of the movie ground staff working on the aircraft to make have a little story. And. I was taking off to do some air to air shots of another Marauder to complete the story of the air of the squadron. When we had an engine catch fire port engine on takeoff and we were just airborne when the. Pilot became aware of what the engine was on fire and of course we he tried to turn and get back to the airfield again but she would not fly on one engine at that height and there was no. One. We had no time Willhite to bail out so you know we just ploughed in cartwheels and burst into flames and that's that's what happened. I was lucky in the sense that. Because the American. Ground crew I think we came down in an olive grove which was being used for camouflaging supplies and bombs and so on and I was rescued from the aircraft by an American I believe and the tail of the aircraft. Was blown clear and we had the chap who was with me in the rear part of the aircraft. He went with it and. I didn't he he got you know but he he got a broken bones and put the chaps up front and so presumably that was a full fully tanked up aircraft with all these extra fuel tanks. I tried and so it was just like a furnace like a flying petrol station really so. That was an interruption to your career and was suddenly the end of my career as a cameraman. Yes so after your your parents or your father came to visit you. Oh yes he. Was roughly where and where are we now in time. We're in February the 20s. Nineteen forty 1944 when the accident occurred and um I was given 48 hours and the registrar who was an Army hospital. And. When the registrar was posting those who had been killed I suppose you'd been told I was only going to live for 48 hours. He posted me as well. So my mother was unfortunate really because she got a telegram saying that I died as a result of injuries received which was why must be an awful shock to her was farther away as well. Both of us away and um. Fortunately as I say father was on the other side of Italy with the 5th Army and when father told General Akers what had happened he he said well you know this is why aircraft go down and see your son. And you can fly him back to England. You know if you can. But. You know when father arrived and heard that I'd already been posted as dad he was absolutely furious. Needless to say because at that stage I was to the land of the living. And he managed to. Because I was heavily doped with morphine. Kill the pain and also I think with the idea of giving me. An overdose to let me just slide away peacefully. And he said well you know I'll find out whether my son wants to die or not just stop giving him the morphine and I'll talk to him. And that's. I vaguely remember seeing the flash of a camera because I saw that I mean I remember making some derogatory remark but even then he couldn't. Hold himself back from his foot photography. Taking a picture of me. I must have been a sorry sight cocooned in bandages and so forth but. He wasn't allowed to fly me back to England. The colonel in charge of the hospital wouldn't allow it. And I think on the grounds that I probably wouldn't survive the journey. But I think also he was highly embarrassed by having posted news or having been writing you off. Or yes writing me off prematurely. But father ordered him to move me to another hospital. And I was transported off over the mountains to Bari on the Adriatic coast to the 98 British General Hospital that even they really hadn't got any facilities for tackling the severe burns and that fortunately they were going well they were going to take my right hand off the next day and remove the right eye. And a surgeon a plastic surgeon from another hospital just a short distance up the coast was visiting the hospital and fortunately. He removed me to his hospital and. Saved my right hand by grafting round the wrists. He wasn't sure whether the grafts would take but he said Well I'll have a gun. And he put my hand in a splint and he said he said well if you know if you were never able to move the hand afterwards at least you will. You'll be able to carry things and you know it may be of some use but the grafts took. And. I was three months in the hospital while they were trying to clear up the burns as best they could because they hadn't got behind bars. And. Each time I had to go down to the theatre and had to be anesthetized once they were doing dressings and putting a little bit of skin in one or two places to cover up the bare bone and she can only now cause and. I think they they tried to cover the left eye. That's at the bottom because the left eye wasn't so bad as the right eye. I'd lost completely my eyelids. I was in a very bad state and of course I'd lost all my hair naturally and I had all been burnt off and eyebrows and quite a bit of the nose. Anyhow Ticky battle was the plastic surgeon there. And I through my life I guess to him and certainly my right hand. No doubt about that. And after three months he allowed me to be flown back to England. And that was from forger to Naples Naples to Algiers. I had to wait in at the RAAF hospital there about 48 hours until there was a liberator taking engine. I think the range and crankshaft back to England for a refurbishing and re grinding and delivery to took me from Algiers to Gibraltar where we refueled and then he did an overnight flight flying over Spain which he shouldn't have done. But that was the only way of getting back as quickly as possible. And. Over occupied France coming down. Over the channel. We had a fighter escort in landing at. Lyneham in Wiltshire and then I was flown from London to Gatwick which was just a cross aerodrome and Mercedes and then by ambulance to East Grinstead that's where I started. How shall we say Archie Mac and doing his team with the Queen Victoria Hospital really started to get to work to cure the burns completely because they had Brian Barnes and to start some serious plastic surgery. He um I always remember I haven't been in the hospital very long and he'd done a day's operating and was doing a ward round after tea and a tremendous pain in the right eye because it was uncovered you know the eyelids column and I was badly damaged and he took one look at it and he said oh no I'll come back after I've had some suffering and we'll see if we can cover that up a bit and that's the kind of man he was you know in indefatigable came back and with the anaesthetist in his theatre sister and I went down for my first operation that he squints did to. Get some relief innovating covering up the right eye of him. Well that was the start of a whole series of operations which went on in between visits to some Dunstan. After eleven months in hospital the first eleven months actually they can do. He's known as the boss to all of us in those days. We've only refer to him as Archie since his death. But he was always the boss to us and uh. And uh oh we we thought he could cure anything and anyone impulsive or just took a little bit longer. Anyway he gave everyone tremendous confidence and and hope for the future a New Zealand directly and he had learned his trade if you like from another New Zealander Sir Harold Gillies is his cousin who was as first was virtually the granddaddy of plastic surgery in this country in the late twenties thirties I think he looked after you know a number of things. First war casualties and so Archie said Well I'm giving you arrest now for six months and build you up and I'm selling you just nonsense. I don't like the idea of going to an institution as a sort of an sort of that put me out put you right off and the fact that he he had said after four years of plastic surgery and rebuilding the face and the eyelids. I probably have a cordial graft operation and recover some sight. Not Ernie and the right eye. But they're certainly in the left which wasn't quite so badly damaged anyhow. What the boss said went nowhere. I went to Church Stretton in Shropshire in January 1945 for six months or nearly six months training. And it wasn't a bit like I'd expect it certainly wasn't an institution that it was rather like going back to school again. And of course I met lots of chaps from all three services including. Air raid wardens. Merchant Seamen all walks of life before the war had lost their sight. Then some were suddenly far worse off than myself. Some had lost their hands as well as their sight. And so it wasn't really as great a hardship. As I had anticipated. It was great fun really learning braille and typing and carpentry and handicrafts doing a fair amount of drinking in the evenings. I think that's where I learned my drinking and I never regretted ever learning Braille. I'd always been opposed to it whilst I was in bed in the hospital and someone had come to see me and I think some nonsense and Ray arranged a visit and in the hopes of getting me started but I just didn't want to know about braille then. But once I was trapped Stratton and everyone else was having their brand class their typing class and so on. I I soon got into the routine and I couldn't be without Braille and I stopped him. What was your resistance. The Brown was it perhaps you thought it might be all right. Well that was it. You see I thought What a waste of time when I learn braille I'm going to see again. And that was my philosophy really. All right. You know as things turned out it wasn't. I had many many operations but only when I whilst I was at East Grinstead for the last three years in between father plastic surgery. But even when I left the hospital and started work back in the film industry again at Shepherd. I went to France and had to walk on in graft operations at different times but after I'd had seven. And no result it was pretty obvious that the retina had been badly damaged either by. Glaucoma which had been one of the troubles by the corneas weren't successful or it could have been by x ray treatment that I had received to endeavour to kill blood vessels which for spoiling the corneal grafts and. Which would destroy the lens of the eye. So I had a cataract. Have that removed and I think the X-rays may also have affected the retina so uh I just gave up having anymore. So when you introduce it. When did you finish your rehabilitation policy. Well I left hospital in nineteen fifty one apps after seven seven seven years. Yes. In and out of hospital and. Several of my troubles from the film unit days. Jim Davis Skeeter Kelly. Eric Cross. They. Had formed together. A small company and back in I suppose about 1945 46 when I was at East Grinstead. They had been visiting me in hospital and asked if I would like to join the company and put my gratuity into it. This is what I did and I used to visit in-between operations just to see what was going on and get the feel of the studio life again. And as I say in 1951 I left East Grinstead came to Shepparton and. I lived in a little hotel at the bottom of many hit Lane here Riverside Hotel little family hotel and I lived there for nearly two years whilst I was looking for somewhere to live couldn't find anywhere at a price that was reasonable and decided the only thing was to try and get a building licence and find a piece of land and build my own house which is what what I did. What was the name of the company Anglo Scottish fickleness because the Scottish element was Dick Andrews who is a great buddy of Jim Davis in the VIP days before the war and. They had decided to be a good idea you know to former and so they skates was a part of it. And then several of the other members of the film unit Charles Heath got to remember them all not to have a challenge to this. I didn't know where he is now. He went to last I heard Charles was about as Addis Ababa would be setting up a television station out anyway this is the house that you you built. Yes. Yes it's original form anyway. Yes it was. I was limited to the amount of money I could spend on it by the building license regulations and what materials could be used. But I was very lucky you know to get a license as a single person. They only usually allowed to marry or to marry married couples. But I was allowed a license on the grounds that my parents lived in economics and travelling from economy to Shepparton was a very difficult journey to nearly two hours on three buses. It really wasn't very practical. And. So I was allowed a license by my Oxbridge council and we had that transferred to. This area and then it was the task of looking for a piece of land which wasn't easy even in those days but eventually be most of the land here in Shepparton was owned by the Lindsay family who owned the manor house. They built the railway line from Shepparton to Strawberry Hill in the latter part of the last century and. Built. Colonel Lindsay was alive in those days and. Said there were several old houses that had big gardens and there was one empty one on the corner of any gate Lane and this was the the site that I finally settled on and it was leasehold at that time for that matter the great thing was to find somewhere to build a house. And. I then had to pay a development charge because you had to pay a development charge in those days as well. Well a lot of formalities to go through and I was impatient or took a long time. But eventually the house was built in nineteen fifty two and I took up residence in November and. I've been here ever since. Tell us about this cottage. Well Angus Scottish had. A very small room in the old house but the studios. Norman Loudon was the owner of the studios in those days and it was sound city. Originally of course and. As the company expanded what we were then given the park keepers lodge at the old entrance to the studio which was closed. And. When I came to work for the company that's. Office sharing it was secretariat was the old dining room of the park cave as large as the front door opened into just this one main room in the house and. The Cutting Room was a kitchen but the back was turned into a cutting room and the bedrooms upstairs. I think it was free if I remember rightly returned into offices very cold place in the wintertime time and there was a question of wearing one's overcoat. Well I've put up with that for a little while and then decided to get one of these oil stoves with the pink paraffin that was available in those days off a blue ocean. You. I said yes one was one was pink and one was blue. What was it. Anyway. That was how we how we used to heat the key for large I didn't I wasn't too sure in the beginning whether I was going to come to terms with the office side of me all of us might even be of any use in that area because I knew nothing at all about the front office the front office. I always thought that we owned the camera crew did all the work and I often wondered what what the dickens they didn't take us. Anyway I soon learned not only all the preproduction work that weeks of work that went into the preparation look shooting was the least of one's work. That was a matter of days or weeks and then there was all the post-production afterwards going through the cutting rooms the laboratory work titles recording commentary dubbing negative cutting funds and print all the procedures that were really as I learned more and more about that side of the business it became more and more interesting but suddenly in the very earliest days when I was just answering the telephone to get to know people and to get to know what it was all about. That was a bit of a struggle. How did you feel about that Jimmy when when you were you know first took the plunge. After all your rehabilitation it must have been mixed feelings. Well I think you know as the let's face it seven years have gone by and I got used to helping him to see it that time. So I No. One's thoughts when you're re rehabilitating when you're having training your thoughts are positive. I think well they tend to overlook the difficulties and things you can't do when you concentrate on the things that you can do to try and do those you know to the best of your ability. And I think each and every one of us are different. Inasmuch as it's easier for some of us to come to terms and overcome those problems than it is for others. And I think the least to dwell on what you're missing and what to what you can do better. You can't turn the clock back. You've got to look ahead and as I say concentrate on the things you can do. But did you ever think that you would ever be working in the film industry again after the trauma of the accident. Well I had. Not really I think in the in the very earliest days. I just know you know what I was going to do. I suppose I all my attention for the first year or so was in getting on my feet again getting getting over the burns getting started on the on the plastic surgery side. I had not thought a lot too much about the future. I mean had the biggest shock to me was being ditched out of a service within a few weeks of arriving back in this country. As soon as I was registered blind I was ditched out of the service is no use anymore and that you know I really thought that was. Terrible. And very quickly we set about. Putting that right not only for myself but getting me the discharge regulations from the hospital. For all service people changed. And it was with pressure with the. Threat of publicity and the threat of. Of. What we were going to do. That. Turned the tide. In the House of Commons. I mean Archie Mac can do is right behind us and a great champion. My father was around then for our time. What he was going to do from the press side. I dread to think that. I'm sure it was the pressures that. Were on it was changed I the ruling was that no servicemen would be discharged until he had reached surgical finality. And that was when the surgeon said well you know I've done all I can. That's it chaps. You. Know. You're leaving. So I was reinstated and I stayed in the service for the next six. Maybe seven years until now knew for doing this. I didn't get any promotion. I. Know they lost. But all the. Other Ranks. So sergeant got an automatic promotion to warrant officer right up to a double entry only to you had to learn officer but I didn't get. Anything here. I mean when you first came back on this. Deck during your plastic surgery day you came out. Yes. Very early to try and see how. Well it was I was say about. What. Would happen to you then and to what you are. There. That's a bit of a hurricane. I did a terrific job was a bit of a mess then. Yeah yeah. You. Must know I mean. I wish I may not but this isn't finished. I'm just gonna I'm just gonna have.

Transcript

Show Speaker

Every time. We try to feel as you were saying you can be about a particular song that meant that we go yes. When we started what we started. We've started this is this is signed for. Right. We move in a rally. Really. You were saying Don't. Take the kind of members of the staff they're very supportive. Well yes he gave a clarity I don't know if you remember he gave it up. Nobody was very very good. What do you remember Peggy. Peggy was continuity on on the adamantly films and. Peggy Mossman who became Peggy Charles. Was the secretary in the Cabinet department and and her assistant was Mary. And when I was in hospital the marvelous thing I think was the way they used to collect funds and they were always sending me records. I've got a marvelous collection of 78 records. Semi classical popular ones at the time. I mean it was all down to down to Technicolor. And all those who were involved in I was raising funds. I really did appreciate the interest that was that was taken and the visits I used to have and in those early days in hospital is tremendous. And then when you when you'd come out and you were starting with endless gratitude you get like marital. Opposites. Well were you. You know I don't. I I think I made one one visit perhaps but. No I was once I was in in work. But. English Scottish work got very very busy when commercial television came on the scene. I mean the size of the company from just a handful of people rapidly rapidly grew. I mean we had our biggest problem was finding the kind of small studio space that you needed for making television commercials because the main studios were far too expensive and the stages were much bigger than we needed. And the only way we could economically produce commercials in that way was to to have a number of commercials to make and to put two stages and change from one to the other all the time build on one shoot on the other and so on and we used to go out to Hill Street where we had a reasonable deal. I think the old BHP. Was it the youngest moon. Or no not VIP. And I just tried to think a British national yes I tried British national and I think as a studio manager he was such a well-known Percy Dayton wasn't he paving a boom operator was Percy day and I got to meet PERCY Well I think it it's a long time in Peabody right now. Him. For MGM. Oh yes. Yes it is. What is it became a big piece. It became such in television. That's right. That's right. Absolutely. It was too expensive to true to Shepperton. We very rarely shot chef. Although. There were. Occasions when cut off from studio with what we did in the air. We couldn't find a large house with a ballroom. To convert. That was the idea we had rather like Braithwaite. Yes. That was the kind of place we were really looking for. And eventually I suggested to the architect who designed my house we'd give him the draft of drawing up some plans for a small studio and just see how much it will cost. And in the beginning everyone's at all that's going to be far more money than we can afford. But nevertheless you know we'll go through the exercise and we'll see how much it does cost. Well as it turned out. Val else's plan was costed and we found that for thirty thousand pounds we could build the studio three thousand thirty thousand. And it was a lot of money. In nineteen fifty five Yeah I suppose in those days the tremendous amount of money but for that amount we built a stage 60 by 60 and managed to build a smaller stage. 40 by 60 which is now a Hollywood studio. And. We didn't have enough money to put the. Floor down at that time but very soon once the studio would raise the money which was easier than we thought. Much easier. And we built a studio and it was being used then very soon after that we were able to put the floors in and. We also. Set up a sound department that we had our own recording and dubbing yet hadn't gotten. While projection theater came you know in the beginning when we called the studio but. From about eight of us in 1951 when I left hospital. By the time the studio was operational and we also had a converted cinema in Adelstein which was the Plaza cinema. And that was being used and was up for sale because a company got into financial difficulties and before we built elephant studio we acquired the old Plaza cinema and we were using that for small very small set animation work trick trick trick work. In those days we had this very painting doing matte shots Derek paintings making models and. Tooling going to of course was in charge of all our animation work. He'd been an editor in the film unit and resolve principal editor and dangerous Scottish when the company first started. But when we got into making advertising films mainly for Cadbury brothers they were our principal clients and we were making colourful advertising films for the cinema. And then when commercial television started of course we were one of about a half a dozen companies that were experienced in making commercials so we were very quickly employed making television commercials. But we went back to black and white. That of course until. I suppose about 1963 as far as color started I forget exactly what it was that BBC toured going on but later than that I think that a little later that year could well be I know BBC 2 was first starting to go into ITV when I came back from America in 1968. I made the very first commercial in colour for Jerry Paulson. Ninety percent of everything that was being done at that time was in black and white. So it was as late as 68 even as late as that. Yes I mean maybe sixty seven there were some big made is but eventually when the studio was complete and was in full operation and then the Adelson studio we were 80 80 on the staff we had for cutting rooms for editors working full time for camera crews. Full time no one on one particular day I remember we had seven units working with four of them in different parts of the world on location jobs Granada Television desperately needed the crewing they had the administrative ability but they hadn't set up a studio and it was technicians and so on. And when the current affairs program search light which I think Jeremy Isaacs was involved in in those days in his very earliest days in television. Bill Lloyd was in charge of production in Manchester and I used to provide the camera and on crews and all the stock arranged the processing and. They used to shoot in different parts of the world during the week. And it was always planned to arrive back on a Friday evening to catch the bastard Humphreys on Friday night. And then the rushes went on several M train to Manchester. And the editors were busy working over the weekend cutting the programme to go out on Monday night Searchlight always went out on on a Monday night. And I think they just projected the rushes today all the day I guess. I don't think they even had time to cut the day entering. But they were exciting very exciting days no doubt about that. But it was a really full time job. At the height of television commercial work I suppose I sometimes have. Around 50 individual commercials all in production. I was production manager by then and they were either in the. Early stages of planning the casting preproduction work the actual shooting or in the post-production stage and. I used to have to do a daily progress report on everything for my own purposes. I had three secretaries working for me then and I used to keep one busy completely on progress reports so that I was able at any time of the day know exactly where a particular commercial was and. This was vital really in the post-production stages because agency producers very often would get onto another. Production and you had to watch carefully. Reading an optical double head day making sure that you. Were left with sufficient time to get any alterations done negative cutting answer print and then the television coffee's 48 hours before transmission because if you if you didn't get the prints delivered if you got a 10 percent file of the cost of the airtime and it was missed and. Tell me. You say you hand me the tapes you know keeping up keeping up to the secretary keeping up to date on that on schedule you have a dual purpose typewriter. I mean so you were I wouldn't be able to read it or measure in Braille. No I never put anything in Braille except my notes. That I took on the telephone. I had a brain shorthand. I did a shorthand Braille course. Just before I started work so that I could take notes telephone conversations fairly fairly quickly but only that I could really read them back just like any shorthand typhus can only read erm because you get into your own method of of. Writing shorthand just as he was shorthand Braille and I used Braille for convenience but not for pleasure. I don't read braille books and. I just haven't got the patience you know to do it. But I keep all my files. I had. All my technicians in files divided up into the various categories of work followed loaders focus operators lighting cameramen sound camera operators boom off raid this mixes you know I mean I could very quickly look up a telephone number and most of my my work. Was done on the telephone costs and very often the evenings because technicians were out working during the day and the only time you could contact you in the evening when they got home self-satisfied production schedules and so then. You rely entirely on your memory which must be fantastic. Well I think a blind person does tend to develop the memory because it's one of your your storage goals and assets really. And I don't claim to. Remember to any telephone numbers obviously the ones that you use very frequently I mean the labs and the various technicians. Suddenly but up to me I would rely on my Braille records very much which would dictate your secretary. Oh yes yes yes. I always dictated as I say every day I would I would write up the progress of each on each job and then at the end of each week all my notes were duplicated for the. Only production create agency to know our own by see our own produce. Because we had a London office by then and we had three or four chaps whose job was to you know wine and dine the our clients and keep them sweet and keep the work flowing in because you know having built the studio we had to keep keeping us fully occupied as we could. And. That was one of our jobs to make sure it was busy busy and we used to hire it when when we had a stage to spare but suddenly it was mostly our own production. Who were your producers and cameramen and editors during that period. There must be some good old 818 names there. Oh well I mean Frank Kingston was. On the permanent staff then. Eddie up was Palin's Jim Davis was how he was a director and chairman of the company. He was principal cameraman staff cameraman as I say but. We had just trained to think they all. Had the gilding boys there then. No they well they started a little bit later on you know towards my last year or so with the company but. Editors we had Julian corn to run run run trainer came to us from the labs and just forget the deal that headed towards but we employed a number of freelance cameraman as we needed. You know we got to know different different ones and you had an animation section and did you. Oh yes. Yes. Who were your animators. That was Julian Julian Corn who was the principal is in charge of the whole the animation and. I'm. Just trying to think of pop pompously type latest. N1 brothers. I mean we How. Yes Jeff and Roger first worked for us in those days. Jeff in the cutting room to begin with. Then he said he really wanted to direct. I gave Jeff his very first job. Actually I was a little export commercial for I think it was Cousin soap but it was something which we haven't a big budget to do and he was so key and he had obvious ability. He never looked back. From then onwards. He was giving giving me lots of small props to learn his trade. And then he very quickly left a simple freelance as so many did you know I mean we had John Spencer a permanent director Len Reeve directing David Paul Tanguy on the staff directing. Did you have a chap called Harold Mac from the animation side. Here remember and here for Howard Mac the name's Smiley he's dead now but he left England. Uh the latter part of the 60s and formed a company in Holland in Amsterdam and he called his company Anglo Dutch. And he started language Scottish because I used to do quite a lot of work with him. He was a very talented man. Great sense of humor. I think it was just after I had gone I may well have been heavily be because you see when Julian and I left when we discovered that we hadn't got the interests in the companies we thought we had but we virtually had a share in the in the parent production company which was always the favourite was written on because all all the assets were into other companies that we'd been told we had an equal share and then discovered we had. So that's why we went well I gave the company ten months to resolve the situation and they were reluctant to let us write. So we left the occasional shock of their lives where we left because we were taking a big chance huge chance and I set up an office in proffer day's old house Shepperton studio. Was the Met artist that gets famous met artists from denim and. Had an office. Up there and for four years I was working from this office in Shepparton and then. Looking around for a suitable studio accommodation and in London because the advertisers really were working much more with London based companies. Whilst in the earliest days it was you know an adventure to come out to in Shepparton studios and rub shoulders with the Stars and the famous directors and producers but they were less less inclined I think later on wouldn't you agree with the keenness to work with a company in London that they could pop from easily and see and discuss a job them and so forth. And I was often told if I had a studio in London you know I would be more likely to get more work. Because I was lame the help of Layne Reeve who also left the company. We set up a small studio called them. But you know it was only suitable for small sense then we had to use studios in London if we had a fix it to build. There was what this could be. What year was this that you know the shady dealing was going behind your back and you decided to break away 61. That's when I left 1961. And so when did you actually moved to London 64 yes 64. You actually moved to London. Yes. Funnily enough the father was looking around for premises like he converted. We first of all found. Gold hawks studio in gold haul road and. Somebody called Freddy Roberts and earned it and it was up for sale for 25000. He was in financial difficulty. There was some John Hale's location so Grover Jones he was. He was in the basement. And. John and Benny Lee had a handful of lights and they were just starting their lighting lighting company Lee lighting. And it was an ideal little studio just the right size. I had used it before and. I just couldn't get the couldn't raise the money because he he had a number of deaths and you had to take on the debts. So Helen's as well as the studio that was the deal. And I could raise the money for the bricks and mortar. No trouble at all. But as regards his debts that was well it wasn't all so sadly we did get it. I believe that's Virgin's headquarters nine total. I don't know a recording studio but a father phoned. 73 Newman Street which was the ground floor was an old warehouse. It had a very it was a listed building and it had a mews a couple booths behind. So you had access for loading and unloading which was ideal for the what was a warehouse. Before that the floor was very uneven and I think it fell away about two or three inches at one side. Anyway we we got a what we thought was a good deal from the landlords and the carpenters at Shepperton Studios ladies a superb floor absolutely dead level I mean you could track on it without any trouble at all without any tracks really. It was a super floor and we soundproofed us and we had a very nice little soundstage there with an office suite conference room. My office secretary's office had a good sized kitchen suitable for food preparation for commercials and upstairs. We had. Quite a nice sized room which we turned into an animation department. So it was ideal for Julian to have his rostrum camera and our title artist and to work up there and eventually we acquired an office for Oxbridge aerial image. So we were able to shoot our own obstacles especially trick trick obstacles. Live action over Kirn cartoon work over live action. And we did quite a lot of subcontract work for other cartoonists and other production companies because the aerial image was a fairly new piece of apparatus. In those days and we could turn out obstacles overnight using this equipment and we had a cutting room and in the basement and makeup and dressing rooms in the basement. So we were able to cast shoot the net it everything under the one roof and process just round the corner Humphreys laboratories of Australian film labs. So it was really an ideal setup and I think the extraordinary coincidence was that it was 73 Newman Street was where the children's film foundation used to be you know in the early days when we used to do some productions for them the Anglo Scottish company. We did several children's films. You mentioned that your father found this property for you when you did your father get involved in your company affairs in any way or influence you. He was a great influence on your earlier life wasn't he. Well he was 57 when Paramount did a deal with the rank organisation and I think the deal was that Paramount around the world was getting rid of a lot of their overseas. I think that they were a little bit afraid of what was going to happen and they were divesting themselves of a lot of their overseas interests and rank. They did this deal with trying to distribute their feature films although the newsreel was still making. A profit not a big profit. My father had. A number of overseas versions going out every week. He he acquired the South American market even from the Americans which was quite something he didn't even go out there. He just sent a newsreel out there and they seem to like it and liked the deal and. So ranks took them over and then a year later shut down the newsreel. So that was father out of work and. The year before when ITN was starting up. He had the chance of of. Running ITN and he turned it down because he had been twenty seven years with Paramount and as he said he'd always been treated well. He had had a good good life was was British Paramount and he didn't want to just leave at that stage. Mind you he got nothing out of it because he got no pension or anything. He got three months pay and that was he was finished and he and of course even fifty 57 although he was very young young man his white hair. I think I must attend to my line never in that vein with white hair. You know they just. They were did they would interview him and then they'd say no. How old are you. As soon as they knew his age. I don't know. And and of course he. Let's face it his knowledge was specialized it was usually in the main although he'd been a cameraman as well in the during the war. So he came out of the film this is altogether. He had a shop at Richmond from Richmond Hill for a while and then when I started the high end film company I persuaded him to give give all that up come and live in Shepparton and. To be a sleeping partner and in the company. What year was that. Six to one. And it wasn't really. Good for my mother's house because she was getting arthritis very badly then and what was working in the shop shopping cooking running the flat as well. I mean really and truly she couldn't have gone on very much longer like that. And I persuaded father. Team to do is to give it up come in with me. I formed a separate company to hold all the animation equipment and I didn't license what salary I had came out of the film production company and. What money he he had came out of the equipment company. And every time we did any shooting we paid a higher charge to the equipment company for lighting equipment in the studio for animation equipment and slowly but surely we we built up the finances and that's how we were able to. Acquire the free aerial image and. That became you know really quite an asset a tremendous asset. How did you paint it. Absolutely. And the sad thing from my point of view is when in nineteen sixty eight. Production in the studio was getting less because advertisers as well as film producers in the feature field were tending to shoot more and more outside studios because it was cheaper they were going on location not only in this country or abroad for the weather as well. And commercials more and more were shot in here. You'd choose a nice modern flat but some furniture in it. And. The studio was idle for too long and I wasn't able to keep the rent rate sky. And so I had to close the studio and very quickly find alternative premises for the animation equipment and that wasn't easy because we had to find somewhere in the West End in the Soho area but somewhere that had the height of the ceiling height for the rostrum which I think was from memory and I needed to 12 feet minimum and. I also had to have a solid floor because you know to have really smooth animation and so forth had to be like that was the aim got married was sixty 68 sixty seven point six I study yes. It was one year one year after it was filmed it was a difficult year and I had I hadn't a very I hadn't a good director commercial director at that time and most of the of the good ones were forming their own companies it was the it was the period when splinter groups were springing up and. You know it was difficult from that point of view we hadn't a big enough capital to take home some with somebody at a very high high salary rate and also I think I didn't have a producer with me to grab the work I had a few regular clients who came with me when I left Anglo Scottish I mean there were tremendous. Without their continued support I couldn't really have got the commercial company going as well as as well as we did tremendous to me during those very busy years of production from about what 55 56 Up to you know the late 60s. What were the highlights of you know any awards or any special films that you made or any particular programs that year. We did the. Bob Hope we did some Bob Hope shows. When he first when the American forces were in Iceland. Attractive Vic I think the very first one we did for Bob Hope was a Christmas show he did for the American troops at Reykjavik and he he badly needed he had a programme going out for General Motors a one hour show regularly and. His brother who'd been a butcher. Was running the check hope he was running the the Hope Enterprises company and Bob would shoot the programs for Hope Enterprises and they would sell and so we did we did it one up there and then Wood Green CSA was owned by ATV. Lou great outfit in those days and Bob and done a deal with ATV to use wood green to shoot one of his shows and there again we we provided the three cameras needed one and trained one on tracks static static camera speed the usual three camera technique for television production. And then we've processed and we've provided all the editing arrangements. Did you know that there was a program on about two or three weeks ago about you know entertainment during the war and so on and there were a lot of Bob Hope shows. I guess that program. I knew it was coming in and Bob Hope and Bruce Francis Langford were being. Did anyone else see that program. Blank. But I wondered if any of that material were whether any of it was recent enough for it to have been yours. Because I suspect I might have been one up in Iceland. Others there was Reykjavik. There was a Woodley would Greenland and then we did order one we did in Casablanca. That was I had a telephone call here one evening from Jack hope from Paris on a Wednesday and he said we ordered. We want to shoot a programme in Casablanca. Oh we're flying out on Sunday. We're arriving tomorrow. Can you fix somewhere for us all to meet and. Have a production meeting on it. I only want a few sets one of a few prefabricated sets take out the usual three crews film one camera. Yes I said Jack. Okay. Call me back and I I just was on the telephone from the time the phone rang here just continually ringing cruise to see if I could get a three camera crews the three sound crews a starter because that meant they'd all got to get inoculations for four. Going out to Morocco. Next to that idea on the Thursday or the Friday ready for flying out on Sunday and then these I. Couldn't think where to have the meeting and then I knew they were flying into bobbing. SIGHS Oh well I knew the proprietor of the portrait Hotel a priceless chap called Louis hands. He was a great party because we lived only a short distance away in economics and I rang him up I said you got a room room room Louis of hope and all his entourage you can come in and talk him out and he fixed some marvellous you know and of course if he treated everybody like it is usual way they were the most special customers. And it is this is normal practice if you went for a meal you'd have a carnation ready for the for the wife has a girlfriend or you know he really made everyone. Know you in those days didn't know you those days very you know he was dead before I knew you'd only. Anyway he felt that up from just a little cafe performing well into quite a well-known restaurant near any one area you know I'm talking about Lujan Saul at the orchard in Reisner. The orchard hotel right. No I remembered Gennaro. Yes because I am father mother in their very young days. They saved up the place yes to an evening out on the road to go there. And he had the habit of giving and. I believe he would probably not let me repeat. After Matthew. I used to think that he always gave a flower to the two all the females Gennaro and I remember as a as I was still a schoolboy when Mother Father we went to a film often it was either the flowers or the Carlton one of the two Paramount symbols and it was all very special we actually went out for a meal to Gennaro as later and father said Well this is where I used to take your mother whenever he could afford it. Uh how real about it. Because the old man Gennaro went down in the US was it the ACBL of the first ship that was sunk I think is he was last but some of his staff was still there for a number of years. After the war. Yes that's a.

Transcript

Show Speaker

But I'd like to do Jimmy. JIMMY Right side five. Last time Jimmy when we were talking you didn't talk about Regan street. But I don't think you came out of it quite clearly enough. Exactly what. What course you were on. Well actually when I left prep school and the large number I mentioned the school just over the bridge over the river cones Uxbridge near Arthur Kingston's. Home run time to the Regent Street Polytechnic to finish my education. But then you know war broke out in September. What that was that would have been what metric you would take. Yes mean trained so well school irony in the school certificate. Yes courses that I don't I didn't have. I see that's that's the thing that I. I didn't figure out clearly. Then going back to really where we got up to. You said that 19 cent 1968 commercials and documentaries were beginning for use real locations rather than get into studios. Yes. I had the studio in Newman Street. And and so you decided to close the studio but you began to get to tell us what happens in the animation world. I see. Well I had to move swiftly out of the studio because you know the rent was becoming due and we couldn't go on another quarter's rent and I had to find a home for the animation equipment. Luckily in Oxford Street we found a top floor of a building which had a room with enough height for the rostrum. I think we needed six feet of clay and a solid floor. And so all the equipment was moved up there and uh I needed them. Some experts you know in the use of animation equipment because unfortunately. Tony O'Leary who had been working with me and using the Hawkesbury aerial image and also just trying to think that his name not. That was another person doing animation whose name escapes me just for a moment. And and because we were getting into financial difficulties with the studio not being used. And he realized you know we would have to shut down. Unfortunately he'd cut employment elsewhere in order to to continue using the equipment I had to find some young people who would be prepared to take it over and go into partnership and uh and carry on the real image work and also animation work. And those two dry facts too. And Alan home. Jeff was working at that time. Gosh I'm. Trying to think of the name of the well-known company. Right pace. Oh yes. Camera effects. Thanks. Jeff was with can we fix and he was recommended to me by Jim Smith who serviced animation equipment and holds a title artist that Jeff had done a lot of work within. They wanted to come and join me as a team. And so. A new company was formed purely for. Animation and optical effects and it was called. Extol Hall and Associates. Well that company. Had the equipment from because it was owned you see by my father and I we had this equipment company which was father's livelihood really. And we had the equipment for three years and we had an agreement with Jeff and Alan that after that three year period was up. They had the option of purchasing it and they took up that option. And unfortunately I was forced out of the company. I had an interest in it up to that point and I had to finance that and really set them off in business but that there were threats of shutting it down. And I just had to accept and use my interests in the in the company. Now of course very flourishing. Well I just had ditched Alan in the mean time. And then finally he did he did me and and set up on his own in Newman Street later on in the studio where he'd been. No actually he firmed promises on the other side of the road to Oxford Street ground floor. And that's where he. He still is but of course he has expanded quite a lot. So that 1971 that they finally eased you out then Jimmy probably would be around about and that was after the three year option was it. Yes after that right. Yes yes. And then what happened after that to me. Well. In the time. A company which I had formed with Michael Easton Smith in nineteen sixty three selects a film productions that was a company where we set it up really just to make feature documentaries for television not commercials that fairly feature documentaries because Michael Easton Smith had been. A producer director in the. BBC 2 drama department. He had done as Z Cars and other series in the early days and he had been very much involved with BBC 2 when they were developing colour and one colour both on BBC Two. So as I say he left and we formed cynics are together and our first production was over lunch which was all about the control and prevention of avalanches. We couldn't get a word about us. BBC 2 series 2 finances. But because of Mike's connections with BBC to produce I think was Brian France and I think he said well you go out and shoot it. We look we like the idea. We haven't haven't ever tackled the subject and if we like it we'll take it said that was the basis which selects the produced their very first feature documentary. When was that made Jimmy avalanche. Well the unit first went out in nineteen sixty seven to Switzerland this time of the air January February time but rather like the situation we're in now. There was insufficient snow. It is a total disaster. And it had to come back and then I mean in some ways it was helpful because they were able to meet the various people in the snow and avalanche Swiss snow advance Institute at Davos and make a lot of contacts ready for when the time would come. You could go back again to cos we had to wait a whole year until 1968. And then the union went out at the end of January and that year they had the worst avalanches for 13 years and the hotel where they were staying was who was hit in the dining room demolished can recall was buried completely. Fortunately they weren't they the in the room when the avalanche hit. And they were able to. Carry on in shooting but they weren't allowed to actually. Shoot. Real rescue sequences. This was. The police wouldn't wouldn't allow that. We had to reenact our own rescue scenes and continue the filming. And coming back and Bryan Cranston. He's not the most adventurous of people would you say. Well in retrospect no. Because it me I suppose you could say it's been our most successful production because. Richard Price had just set off an agency to sell programme services and it was one of his his first feature documentaries that he took on. And it has it sold in over forty overseas countries. Well the major television centres around the world have used it and repeated it swell and it's still even after 22 years. Uh I had. An order for a couple of coffees from Canada just before Christmas. That's 60 million. Yes yes. Did it win an award or two. No. We never we never entered it and I don't know why. But we never entered it in any competitions at that time of course is far too old now. I want to update it very much indeed. But I haven't been successful in finding finance funds so much. Yes. Yeah yeah I had it. So you have to try Eddie that they met they make the case that yes something like that. Yes. Well maybe it's knowing. Yes. And jumping out of the right way when there is a time to tackle them really well thinking about the next Skinners. Nick Struthers is a skier. Of course he'd be ideal to yes to shoot something like that. Yes he would. Well Andrew was on the crew you know when we shot it. Gill Vauxhall was the camera man. Yes. Yeah. In those days. And his son had we been able to set up a shooting again. Ray was going to be the cameraman and then Gil's son on focus but it never happened. It hasn't happened yet. It hasn't happened yet. Then. Tell us more about the the feature documentary business made. Well we we went on to make. Another film. Which was called Estancia. And that was the. Life in the area of polo ponies. And Mike was a very keen polo player and he had a couple of ponies that had polo club and he lived almost next door. He lived with his side and he loved it and he had those days Jimmy Edwards was one of the players in the team and one or two other well-known figures. And so Mike had this idea of making you feel going right through the seasons and. It was shown on one or two television stations Scottish television took it and he went to overseas come. Outlets but it didn't do really very well. But shortly after that Reich had this marvelous offer from South Africa from a b c TV South African broadcasting television company. They were wanting to set up television in South Africa and he was offered a three year contract to train technicians and there was an agreement to renew it for another year. And while he renewed it for several years and eventually decided that he preferred the life out there over here. So he's he's stayed that I was bereft of my partner and I endeavored to keep things going for a number of years and made one or two films. But you know it wasn't easy. A blind person can do everything to get work in the cited industry. This was after you had left. It folded up in London. It's film city. Oh yes. And well we started it. We had the studio. Yeah. You said you started in 63. I'm trying to establish here when I went to Europe. You lost your partner in fact. What were those years when you were finding it rather difficult to manage on your own. Celexa. Says Mike must have been about 72. Must've been about nineteen seventy two should think. That's right. That's when he when he went south africa for good. Yes because he he really he came back on a visit really to sell his house. Yeah that was several years later and the way I was told you know is can we talk on his phone again. Yeah. And he's thrilled when I send him up copies of the videos of the productions and the company is still still going although we're still afloat. Two offers of a show. Well yes. Well I don't think it isn't. Yeah I think directing the bottom. I don't think so. Robert goes to ground at the moment but after just 72 what kind of what kind of ID you have in your savings then anything outstanding. Well the first production that I had I did you know after my garden was a film about support for the multi handicapped. Salute we got when the WHO WAS THE. Spinal injuries. Yes. Surgeon at Stoke Mandeville. And he started wheelchair sports in 1944 with a group of x service men and women who were patients in hospital and that side of sport for the disabled grew over the years. But it eventually took on other handicaps amputees and their suffering with cerebral palsy and the blind of course and uh the very first international sports competitions for which they were internationally agreed rules for disabled people was in nineteen seventy four. And so Ludwig hadn't got a film. No one had ever made a film about since sport for disabled people. And he had not had any money the very sports association for the disabled PSAT there hadn't any any funds. So I had to start writing letters to various companies that I thought might agree to sponsor it. In fact it was almost cut and dried with WD NATO wills and then unfortunately the public affairs man was killed in a road accident the year before we were going to shoot and I tried. Other organisations breweries as well and didn't have any success. So I then got in touch with someone who was a professional charity fundraiser and who worked on a 10 percent commission yet commission and eventually we raised in time just enough money so that we could actually shoot and include the first ever international sports competitions at Stoke Mandeville which I was desperately keen to get in the film. So uh and we shot at schools for the disabled where sport was very much a part of the scene. And. Once we'd shot everything we then had to wait until I'd raise the post-production money. How much did it cost you. James and the initial shooting course is a long time. Twenty thousand. No not such as that. No no. No. Maybe ten. I quite had the exact amount. Oh without going to the finance. But I needed 3000 to complete you know to do the editing you having and titles and so on. And I managed to raise that through. Style. Not Starr's organization for spastic see the sparks organization which is sportsman uh. Pledge to support disabled. Persons. And they put up you know it was a real surprise. The whole three thousand that I needed so we were able to push and complete and then make a salute to the full which he insisted on doing the introduction. An unfortunate English being Jewish refugees. He's English. He was awfully good but he was pleased with the result. What we did. Afterwards I showed it to Prince Philip's query with a view to making another version for hopefully to try and get it on television and fastest. Prince Philip might agreed to the commentary when only the equity came and had a look at it and we showed it in the runway a short Seattle afternoon and a couple of days later I got a telephone call and the Queen said. Prince Philip didn't really feel that he would be prepared to do the commentary that he would be happy to do a full load. I couldn't believe I could. Good luck. Because to actually have him there in person do you forward was was far far better proposition he said. And so we went to the phone to Buckingham Palace. Uh fatefully very kindly let Prince Philip for me for I think to Freddie. And. We had this marvellous forward form for the film and a much tighter edit than Gordon honeycomb did the Coventry and we've we've produced a film which was that network over the ITV new channels in the end. That was quite a historic film. Then if that was the first film about disabled athletics for us it was really yes it was that way and your relationship with Prince Philip first started. Yes. It was actually. I mean from word on. When we came to when I was to say we weren't in the city a charity. To help with access and help for disabled people living and working in the city of London. So Sam Gardiner who who's also a member of the guinea pig club yes double amputee. Sam was very keen on re-employment of disabled people helping in that area and he's sort of a jolly good idea to have a film about employment. Well actually we sort of verbal disabilities. Well when we came to research we found that you couldn't include the mentally handicapped because that was a totally totally different area. And we decided to make two films where do we try and raise the money. First of all for the welcome home for the physically handicapped. And. I routinized to Prince Philip if he might agree to participate in it and come to the Queen Elizabeth foundation Bandstand. And this he did and which was marvelous. We we did a half day in the morning with him visiting Bandstand and they will jump to me and they carried her went up to Buckingham Palace. A short sequence was in the palace and I think really that. From involving Prince Philip was employment for handicapped people. Really it really did trigger off a lot of interest and help once to be launched and shown on television. How much of that unaccustomed to make you. Can you remember that. Yes that was about twenty five thousand. That was shot on film and it was three weeks three weeks shooting because we were shooting it. All over the country again. What was that film called. Gymnastics Team. Yes. Get the picture. It was cool. And oh of course that's where Prince Philip was the expression at the end of the film. Well the picture I get is that. Her. Ability is where you look for it. Picture my head is that ability is where you look for it. So that was the title threat for later on ability is where you look for it. And that was a compilation of best achievements by disabled people in employment. And in sport we use parts of get the picture. Parts of our films fought for. For the disabled and in the meantime we've made powerful love me flown to mentally handicapped people. In which Brian Rix did the Ford for it. Well the opening sequence for it and that was the year before he became director of. Mencap. Yes. He was sort of making up his mind then. I really feel that having made the film with us that that decided hey maybe I'll be in time. Jamie. Well time no. I suppose you get the picture. I miss that round of UPS 77. Have been about some abilities where you look for 81. In the meantime we had we'd made mentally handicapped. Yes. How to survive in an occupied country. That was the title of the one on employment of the mentally ill how to survive how to survive in an occupied country. The drive by listeners who wrote the script and he felt that uh. Mentally handicapped people in that sort of situation there they were run to understood or misunderstood. And so we did a sequence with Brian Rix on a on a day trip across to the line. Yes. And in all the situations he is totally out of step as it were with all the people on the boat who were a funny hats and and seeing the usual sadness when he got over to France uh they were misunderstanding his his fate in French. And then we tried to create that that sort of situation and then bring him into a school for the mentally handicapped. One hearing chapter and a meets school. And in time this is between 77 and 81. Yes that's right. Yes yes that was made to often get the picture. Some day. Yes yes. Now then after after abilities Why are you looking for it. What are you finding. I find it so these easier to come by. Well it was easier to finance how to survive in an occupied country because they be the first film. Had been a very successful launch and with Prince Philip involved in it a lot of the people who. Put money into that film agreed to put some money into the other one. I don't think the fact that we showed it to Brian Rix to get his agreement you know to take part and then cap themselves put a substantial amount in. And I think when you're when you're trying to raise money for films if you can say like we were able to their main cut have already. Advanced x number of pounds it does give an incentive to others to give their support so that it was relatively speedy getting getting the money for that for your. Talent. Tell us about the Black Crowes. Did you have your own crew on. This or did you. Why are you bringing people in. Oh yes it was always always a question of freelance crews because of course I was making just a film whenever I was able to raise money. They were all totally funded by sheer efforts from from. I was someone I engaged to help raise the money or through the charities those making them for and you know the the first film. Did you use professional charity as a fundraiser. Did you use him again. No I don't know any just that much. Just that once. Yes but by this time then you become established as well as somebody anyway. Well we certainly had that in the bag and but it still was quite difficult because it was just dinners through four years later to say I was in the city or wanting to do the film in front of the physically handicapped. And so it meant them writing because it's much easier for a charity to raise money than for me as a filmmaker to try and raise money because obviously you would be thought that I'm just trying to do it to to make some money and yes obviously trying to do it you've got to make money to make a film. But as I say if it if it's for charity it's easier for a charity to raise some money if they can. And then so now we've we've got two. Villages where you look for it. Now. What after that. I suppose the next one after that was to live again that we produced for Sundance movies and that was the first film that they'd had made for many many years. Had had run made which Anthony Asquith directed was it was it was a total disaster. But. I mean he wasn't a documentary foolery. Let's face it and it was rather stupid move for they didn't know I was in business and making films fairly early on in my Scottish career. We weren't asked. I don't know who advised them that they were ill advised that it as I said a student to come off so they never made another another film too. I need to live again for them. And we went and sold them for that in the film festival and a silver in the international rehabilitation Festival in New York. Directed. By. Psychiatrists. Oh yes. So I acted. Donnelly Smith wrote the script for it. Can you remember what it cost to make. Yes. Uh that one close some 25000. Haha yes it was a horror film I made two weeks two weeks shooting in the day two weeks and a day in different parts of the country again. I had news wouldn't cuss today because what year was that. That was Cena 79. That's all I should think. 79. In fact it's it's it's. That's how just about it before and. After. How to survive. After having survived and tried. Tried. 79. It must have been about that time. The only regret and dated decent dump sounds raised that money themselves. Oh yes yes yes I have no idea it was. From my point of view it is conditioning food and so it was much easier. Like Chuck Shackleton isn't one of the first jobs he did as a lighting cameraman I think. He does commercials now. Yes. He's with the really useful company now. Mike Shackleton you see one of the directors commercials. So now we've been quite a bit there. So then after that you did the abilities where you look for it because that was 81. That's right. So. Now then we. So what comes what comes next. Then all those three from Prince Philip if he came to the launch that BP is for telecast. And yet in the cities as they all had a really good send off. So too often that was. Well that was during the year of the disabled wasn't it 1981. That's right. It was. Yes. And that was a rather special year for you wasn't it. Oh. Yes. Yes. I was. There's one particular week in that year that I always say that was the week that was because it. Was on the Sunday night. It was in March. I think I was awarded my BAFTA yes Award on Sunday night and on the Tuesday I was at Buckingham Palace to receive the OBE because I had received that in the New Year's Honours. I know I on Thursday. Prince Philip I. Was a luncheon at BP because we were we were launching ability as we look for it. So it really was a real royal week as you might say. Yes yes I'd forgotten what happened then. So yes. So now what. And it didn't help me with more films unfortunately. But it was a very busy a voluntary front you know. I mean because having served as the New Year's Honours publish it. They were setting up throughout the country. Support groups for the International Year of Disabled People of which Prince Philip Prince Charles was. He was the natural patron patron. And in each county there was a county representative. And it was his job to do to get as many support groups in each county going. And I'm afraid I was dragooned into being the chairman of our group here in Spence on which was called the spousal integration group. And our job was to. Spell out the needs really of disabled people during the year and especially year. Our two main aims of course were access for wheelchair users and mobility. In other words getting from A to B is is the biggest problem that confronts all disabled people whether they're blind or in a wheelchair or whatever the handicap is getting from A to B is really the biggest problem and that was sloppy that things aren't.

Transcript

Show Speaker

Jimmy right side six. Now Jimmy you've been talking about the local support group. And it's about this time you were talking you formed a partnership. Yes actually. I had worked with Robert Davies through production partners because Nicole Torres was a member of production partners and although Jandali Smith had written the script for how to survive in an occupied country and this nonsense fell he wasn't available to direct. He directed get the picture but uh I needed to find a director. And I knew Nick Nick had been a client when I was making commercials when he was young and Rubicam and also with another agency that was handling the Rothman account name escapes me for the but. So I enlisted the help of Nick to direct how to survive in occupied country and also this nonsense. Robert worked with me on how to survive in my country. He was. Kind of production manager. That was the unit during the shooting and then uh we seem to through those fellows we met on a number of occasions uh lunches and talks with the client and so forth through post-production and I needed someone badly to to um to join me and as it were be my eyes to hopefully try and promote and work together. And he agreed to become a director of my company and that's how we struck up the partnership. I suppose the next film in 1981 was for the rural school for the Blind which we reshot in February 1981 and it was during the during the shooting that nationwide came and did some shots of us on location that never had station where we were reenacting a 1910 scene of a young 16 year old girl arriving and being picked up in a pony and trap and taken to the Royal School for the blind and the head. So I was then in the next thing I was in a nation wide programme on BBC after the news you know. But it was this was this this was was this commissioned by the Writers Guild. Did you race after race. Oh the idea that it was commissioned by one of the trustees of the Royal School actually. He financed it. That was called. Living for tomorrow. They were voting two thirds of their school for the Blind was founded in 1799 the very first school for the blind to be established in London. And it was for. An indigenous poor. And the idea was to train blind children to become useful citizens rather than for them to to go into begging situations which was the sort of going means of getting you living in those days. So it was the very first school to encourage training of blind children to lead nearly all the lives as possible. And then and you know run the schools at Southern and this site was needed with the coming of the underground railway. And that's when they moved to a lovely site and never had. And it took two years to build the existing building with its own chapel and concert hall but this was why we went to look at it in nineteen eighty. Or it might mean the end of some design but it was when we were the governors were talking about whether to shut it down because it was so Dickensian or to try and raise four million pounds to completely modernize it in four phases. And that's what I was asked if I would make a fundraising film to help you with their fundraising efforts. That's how I was my first involvement with the Royal School and then the following year when the Princess of Wales the Prince of Wales was who was courting. Lady Diana. And. And when he was engaged I thought well royal school hadn't had the royal patron since Princess Marina had died some years earlier. So I wrote to Prince Philip and asked if there might be any chance that. After the marriage. Of Princess Di might agree to become the patron of the Royal School. Well we didn't hear anything. The marriage was in the August and in February of the following year. A letter arrived to say the from from the equity of the princess to say we're very pleased to let you know that of the five charities she'd agreed to become a patron of the Royal School as well. So that's how we do. So that's down to you. Jimmy Wright strikes against you the one time one of the trustees had dug out for a document which indicated that a member of the Spencer family way way back in 1799 or eighteen hundred had been one of the signatories to the Royal Charter. School was founded so hastily photocopied that and said that aft to the. I sent it off to the uh to the palace leader and. Whether that had any bearing you could have been a great grandfather one could ever tell upon let it be known great grandfather great great great great great great great. Yes yes yes. From time Jackie Matheny I'd say yes. Yes I was. No they came a time when there was an invitation to go to to meet the equity go to the palace and surrender rates was the chairman of the Board of Governors of the Royal School and I was to meet him at the Army his club the RTC club and we were to go along together to the palace and I boarded the train at Shepperton and it got slower and slower it got as far as Wimbledon after that for an hour or so and then it had a lightning strike at Waterloo. We were tipped down to the train at Bolton. Well I had to get in a queue the telephone box to ring up the palace and say I'm terribly sorry. By that time it was the time we were due at the palace. So I had to rig up and say well I will build an station I'm terribly sorry but I'm not going to be able to get to the meeting a will. Upset accept that deliver than anything else. So I never ever got to that meeting that progressing and that after after the living tomorrow which is 81 what next. Yes possibly. Uh it might have been building their future the following year when the first phase of the modernization was complete and the princess came to open the the new wing which was almost her first public actual public engagement when she had to speak and she was terribly nervous. She was only 21 or short was anyone 21 and not enjoying that part of it at all. She was lovely with the doubly handicapped possible deadly handicap line that had leather head and you know she was really marvelous. Was she having taught children. Yes. And so she she was quite famous with people and talking to them quite normally and naturally and and then a very. Warm human way. Absolutely super. So we now into in 1982. Yes. Yes. And this is the right school for the blind. If you do any more with them. No I haven't made any more films. But I was asked if I would join the board of governors. And you know I'm still serving on these calls the general General Court and we have them on the Finance Committee and I've helped you know with fundraising the revitalization of the school. And I did some some projects including Paris 17 I did in 1983 that nose wheel there Drew my. I've gained a height record presenting for a disabled person in tandem with a chap called Andy Cowley who works for the urban parachute company. Designing and so forth and he and I did two thousand one hundred feet on a 30 foot wing parachute to set up that that record and which was televised and to be sponsored further. You know row school and. 23000 you know to 2100 feet as well. Yes. 2001. Yes. Yes. Terrifying. 1 1 0 1 marvellous experience. Didn't get your parachute upside down that time. No. The good thing about Paris Sandy is that you inflate the parachute before you go up. No towed up on a winch towed off on a winch. You see in and at a given height you know you're released and then come down. At what point do they release you. Do you say let me down now or. Or do they. In the case of the going off in tandem with Andy. Of course when he he got a height meter with him and because he wanted proof of the height. The idea was to put it in the Guinness Book of Records I don't think it ever was. Nobody ever did anything to to do that. As soon as we reached the the extent of the cable because that's what it all hinged on the length of the cable we had I see was very fine cable to get that height. And when we were past 2000 he released the cable and we then came floating down and he guided us down of course. Well now what I wanted to do very much that day was to do a solo using two way radio. But. The weather conditions changed and we couldn't do it. So I had to go back again to North Wales on the 30th of September. I think it was and it was very very low cloud that day and it got very murky and I only reach six hundred feet before I was disappearing in the in the cloud. And so they were the two way radio. They gave me the command to disengage the tow line and then I steered the parachute back. Using two way radio directions. Land Rover. Land and road. Yes. That set off. When you get into debt levels that is probably when when you get down to about 40 feet from the ground he'll say sort of 50 40 30. And you know your virtually on the point of touching man and new. Use that old technique of saying there needs to be a the second time for your knees together completely relaxing and letting yourself roll over when you hit the ground. And that's that's all I could do that rely on that that knowledge jar you know. No no I wrote fine. Your biggest need are divided trees world. This was at an airfield you see plenty of space. Well I did it the last time which was just over three years ago. I did one for the Julie Andrews appeal. This time I did it on the big 30 foot wing that I got off in 10 to one and I did one thousand two hundred feet. Sarah as a soloist the highest a blind person was that it was that televised. They didn't turn up. They were going to the night before ABC News. They had given me the names of the crew and we waited around. We stood around for ages waited about an hour and then got on the radio telephone to find out when they were arriving and they said We're very sorry about the Princess of Wales has had a baby in there. I mean Mary's Hospital and everybody is there. Oh well you know it was all hands on deck so that was that. But it was a wonderful experience flying the big 30 foot wing on my own because it does take quite a lot of strength on the takeoff when you're actually being towed up keeping it straight. And I learned I can't see the winch. So. I've probably lined up fairly carefully with it. According to the wind and everything at the beginning and then using two way radio if I start to veer left or right I've got to correct it. And you really need all your strengths from the takeoff because you're going up really like a high speed lift. And. So pretty soon reached I think it was 1200 on that particular flight. And. And it was much lighter coming down on the wing parachute than coming down on the round one. You make a lighter landing than you do you'd come down more slowly but you have to collapse the chute when you get to a certain height. You were given the command to collapse issue to do pull simultaneously both toggles and collapsed and dropped to the ground. But to do that when you're very very close to the ground had you done any damage before you move the run. When my life was saved in Italy that was the only job I've ever done. They wouldn't allow me to. I wanted to do a sponsored parachute jump from an aeroplane further run school for the blind and the British Parachute Association wouldn't want to allow a blind person to do so. And that's really how we got into Paris ascending as an alternative. Yeah. So you you failed to make TV coverage of Diana's baby always remember the day that Princess Diana's baby au Prince's house. Yeah. Yes. So now what comes what comes up in 1983 gosh. Well in nineteen eighty four which films did we do together. The first time was it. That's the first film you and I did together was I think educating Brian wasn't that they'd ever see him. No MSE No we started working on the script. Yeah before before. Yeah. I think that was 1984. We started writing the script. And you did the fundraising and then we worked on the Manpower Services Commission or the new white paper. Yes. On the employment of disabled people in industry. So Morrison I did a code of good practice to try the employment and that's the educating Brian. No. This was for the Manpower Services Commission as it was then in Sheffield. They wanted a video which was going to be launched at the fit for work every year. That's a Fit for Work Awards which goes to the companies that in most successful was employing disabled people. And Margaret Thatcher was going to be there to to learn shit. And Tom King I think was the minister of employment at that time and he was personally going to send 200 copies to two 100 captains of industry to try and motivate them into the idea of employing disabled people. And then Maurice Knight simultaneously did a slightly longer video. To follow up follow this up which was for personnel managers and line managers. That was. Gosh I forgot what that was called. I've got the title in the office. Can you you but that was slightly longer. And unfortunately on the 12th of November. I suffered an aneurysm and had to go into hospital and so I missed the launch of the films. We did educating Bryan the following year. That's in 84 83 85. That was Jimmy. Oh I see. Yes we also made in 84 before I went into hospital. I had been raising funds for a year to make a film on teaching blind people to sail for the Seamanship Foundation and they run one week courses every year teaching blind people to sail and the courses take place at coastal yachting centres that agreed to make all their members agree to make their boats available has to be a certain size of boat it'll take five people to flying people up another way instructor the boat owner and an assistant to take people out and teach them to sail for the more experienced plane sailors. They have a cross-channel traffic as well over to France. So we had one camera filming the instruction and inshore sailing returning to in this case it was the royal Cornish. Yacht Club that. Funnels. So they will. Back at families every night and we have a lovely camera. And sound man. One of the three boats crossing to France and he made a film called Blind Faith. Then there again it was touch and go. We only just managed to raise enough money to shoot it because well one week in the year. The program takes place and we just managed to get the money. Two weeks before the course started. How much. How much did it cost to make that that one cost just under 20000. And was it half hour again on network on the ITV channels and. At the moment it's the discovery channel in America has taken it and so it's still got some life left in it. And of course it's used by the highway Seamanship Foundation to promote saving for plain persons. British Council have taken copies of it you know can sell overseas and or life forms on disability and improving the quality of life of disabled people. The British Council who had copies in their aim is to you know to promote promote overseas. Yes. Yeah. In 85. What. Now. Eighty five. I think this is where we actually shot educating Bryan had certainly shot educating Brian yes tell us about that. Well uh. Another film promoted by disabled kids in the city. They first of all had in mind we threw a blind person who works for British Telecom. It was his idea to do to have a film about blind people and their electronic aids to help blind people and the proper term. So that really we should cover a wide range of disabilities which was a truly good idea and so we were able to widen the scope of the Mrs. Beatty of. Neuro to. It was not really a big charity. Sorry but the blind person was working with Beatty. So it's his sort of range and in the beginning which was the scope was widened through the child and wanting to cover. And of course I felt the same way know being involved with all sorts of different disabilities as well as having a marvelous idea. And. It took a long time you know to raise the money. Took us well over a year to eventually raise sufficiently to shoot and we were close to nearly 30000 that cost actual net net costs just under 30000 sorry just under 50000 just under 50. It was it was about eight thousand. That's right. That's right there again we were shooting three weeks where we lost it spans three weeks. I think it was about 16 days and actual shooting time. Sixteen mil won Silver Award with educating Brian in the film festival. You were told I believe that it would have won the award for being the most the most brightly film for television. Yes that's right. Had we not already pre sold it to tell her. Yes. Yes. So that has a network. Yes. And there are TV channels and there again British Council have taken it and it's been used extensively by schools and I show it very often mainly to sixth formers who talk about disability and what disabled people can achieve if they're given the right training them in so for us now where do we go now. Wasn't that the time you made the collectors with Don Higgins. The late Don Haig yes yes. The two which you did just before in the round about the same time I think. Yes I think I think we did. This was a three minute film for the greater London fund for the blind showing in London's cinemas where managers arrange for a volunteer team of collectors to go around the auditorium during the showing of certain films. And he thinks you know will be good box office and very good chance of collecting quite a lot of money. And they give the charity three three minutes screen time and two minutes for the collection. So they give him five five minutes in or out of the programme time. And Tom Higgins wrote the script and directed a very successful film that raised a lot of money for the TALF. It's now changed its name to sightline because it was often being confused with the GLC which has now disappeared. Didn't they say that 35 35. No. Yes. Yes. Then. Now. Where are we. We are in 80 85. Write things I think. Yes. Wait. Yes. Which of the 86. Well. October. Just trying to think when we shot the news and done since it was launched in April two years ago. Mr Shorten is in an 18 October 87 I think. I think that was 87 yes. Some nonsense requiring a new film because. Between the Falklands War. In between. Fortunately only one person had lost his sight in the Falklands campaign. Terry Billingham chief petty officer in fleet. But he had been extremely successful in with his rehabilitation training and employment and there were also several other young son downstairs who had lost their sight either in accidents during service in West Germany and further in Ireland and it was felt that the schools needed to know that some dancers was an ongoing concern and that it wasn't just servicemen and women who lost their sight in World War One World War 2. It was still a question of servicemen and women losing their sight in one way or another and still needed needing training rehabilitation and and getting drugs for them. So we made a new film called Partnership for life which of course Terry Pulliam featured prominently. He's now working for the great American Society for the Blind in Aberdeen and we featured several other young men. How long was that. That's a half hour as well. Do you remember what it cost you. Yes that was eighty thousand sixteen will be shown yet again. How long did it take you to show you were two weeks and a day. I had to go to Aberdeen I had to fly the unit to Aberdeen for the sequences featuring Terry Gilliam. We also shot in caring hands I think for the rest of us that year. Yes. Another video that Morris scripted and directed for us was Kerry hands with British Red Cross Society. There's a video of that yes which Nicholas Struthers was a cameraman and this was all about the makeup that goes on in hospitals with geriatric geriatric patients who are permanently in hospital or long term patients which is a tremendous help to give them you sort of make them feel a lot better to have a hairdo and a massage or makeup. It all helps. I think it was getting well again. And how long was this video. That's half hours. Well tell you this the first time you know you've been involved in it. No it isn't the first time second time you've been involved in video. More than that. No the first one was with Morris on manpower services and services commission and then in caring hands and roundabouts. Same time we did one for the action for the disabled customer committee of British Telecom. So video that was to promote a change of attitudes on the part of the staff in the P.T. shops towards disabled people to understand better. Their needs and to show them a wide variety of different aides available for a wide variety of disabilities. Did these clothes be seen in the V.T. shops and demonstrated. So. What's it what is your feeling about working with video. Well I think the particular part of it which is really. Helping with budgeting and the discussions that go on in the early stages of the scripting and research and so on doesn't differ in any way from from film making. It's only the actual apparatus for producing the final picture and sound post-production work is is quite different. Really. But from my point of view I'm not seeing the end result in either case. But I am in that recording and dubbing sessions in the post-production stage. So that doesn't seem to. From my point of view differ a lot. And of course we can get the. We can walk out of the online Seattle with the end result. We haven't got a vote for the for the Arts Apprentice. Well if I may interrupt here. What I'm amazed at is how Jimmy has adopted new technology. You know just taking it all in his stride as he's been working with it for years and I think that's quite an accomplishment that he's done this because we've all found it rather difficult you know really to make the transition. I think I think probably I have had to take a lot for granted because I couldn't possibly understand the technology Oh. Putting putting an image on videotape and I've just got to accept that it's it's electronically achieved. That's right. And try to come to terms with the ever changing terminology of the of the. Technical work afterwards. I to stop you there a moment during in.

Transcript

Show Speaker

In caring hands. But now. We're wearing these seven up. Yes. Well we've done we. British Telecom give you the news and nonsense. Well I've been very polite. Uh well in most my work together again uh on a video which is entitled second sight and that is uh. For teaching late starters. In other words children who lose their sight whilst at school um to learn Braille. Learn to read braille because um you can never really tell how bad the sight is going to deteriorate. There are a number of rather obscure um I know this is uh well one kind or another that would have different effects on site. Some have peripheral damage and leave you with tunnel vision and some have the reverse and all will worsen to a degree but you never know. You never know whether you do end up being registered partially sighted or totally blind. Over 80 percent of blind people. Are really partially sighted but the amount of site each can see varies tremendously from just shapes uh to perhaps the ability to see very big print or they have apparatus now which will in large print and photographs about 45 magnification is through a television system and these are very often used to help people with employment. But as I say there are a wide variety of diseases of the eye and it's much better if a child is beginning to lose their sight to be prepared for the worst hope for the best. What be prepared for the worst and if you can persuade parents and children themselves to take up rail in the early stages all the better. That's about 1988. Yes it must be. Yes. 1988. That was a video. Yes. And that's that was the brainchild of a teacher at the school. At. Abseil in Seven Oaks which belongs to the Royal London society for the blind founded 150 years ago. But it is the largest school for the Blind in the south of England and Isabella Earle has been teaching Braille herself for over 20 years. She lost her sight at the age of 19 while she was at university. So she knows all about the late start who is learning braille and was really the ideal person to be featured in to talk about the problems and and inspire other teachers of braille and how to overcome those problems. She's had a very successful tour in America with the video. She has a note for you. You know amongst those notes I give you to thank you. Yes. Is she. She won a bursary from a teacher's bursary last year from Esso which was largely brought about through Sam Gallop chairman of opportunities for the disabled who raised the finance to make the video. And as I say she's she's had a tremendously successful term in America. And the videos being shown you know to good advantage are already out there. Yes let's press on. That's. Where we are. We're in 88 seconds. Yes. I have had the rust. Yeah the quietest year that was eighty eight point eighty nine. Eighty nine. Yes. Total disaster really from the point of view of new production because although the Royal School for the blind that they had wanted a new film they've neither had enough money to make it or a grade yet on a final script for it. We started off with an ambitious project because they were thinking in terms of a royal launch and so on. But when they realized the cost of that kind of production we've been making alterations not actions to get it down to the kind of price that they can they can afford. But we haven't had know news yet whether they've got the money or they like the latest idea. But you have been doing other things. Oh yes I've been trying to get avalanche get the finance to reshoot avalanche. I've been also trying to through BBC Ten's television channel for trying to get a full refund Electric Boat made for the electric boat association. This is very much an ecological project because of the cleanliness of electric power with boats. The profit is the lessening of the erosion of riverbanks because the slower boats different shaped hull there are lots of aspects of the Electric Boat that are an advantage over the diesel petrol engine. But there again it's trying to persuade Tesla television companies although they are supposed to put out 25 percent of their work to independent. Companies. I've have certainly not been successful yet had you on 1 percent and still trying. What else have you been doing that. Well the voluntary work goes on course. We've just completed twelve years of producing Torquay newspaper for the blind and severely physically handicapped in the spill zone and really need two adjacent powers. I'm chairman of young disabled mobility club that's. A club which we formed largely out of the 1981 International Year of Disabled People that we started with a local localised club. Called Phil's on speed well supercar club and that has become a registered charity under the new title young disabled mobility club and we've widened the area that will help raise funds for battery operated mobility aids for severely handicapped young people. And we supply them to schools for the disabled as well as fan clubs and to individuals someone involved in what I have mentioned opportunities for the disabled which is an organization you know finding employment for disabled people. We have a city headquarters in offices supplied by the Bank of England and we now have 11 regional branches throughout the country each with its own regional director and secretarial help and it's entirely self. So funding the idea is to have personnel who are seconded by barge companies and we're fundraising all the time for providing bursaries for handicapped people to uh to do different activities. Music We've got cathedrals restoration of cathedrals project on mainly involving deaf deaf persons either you know with a woodwork. Sculptor stained glass work and things of that kind. Do you think there's any any areas where you like the film industry or television industry but be of more help to disabled people. I think since our very first films were shown on television it was quite difficult in the beginning to persuade television to show severely handicapped persons on the box. But I think in 1981 here was the turning point and I think the media did a lot of a lot of good. No it wasn't it wasn't many that you may not have heard what I was meaning really was no Kennedy industry find places for do you think they should find more places for disabled people. Is there a place in the industry when a real industry has an obligation to employ 3 percent of its workforce if they employ 20 people on your 3 percent should be disabled by as to decide. Yes but yes I am. Yes I appreciate that I was. Sorry I should have made it clearer what I mean in technical technical. And technical areas. I mean you know weekly we know we have. We do have commissioners we do have telephone operators we have those kind of people that go on technique on the technical side. Oh yes we have lots of lots of disabled people now doing all manner of technical jobs. It's all a question really of training. I mean once a disabled person is trained there's no reason on earth why he or she can't work in exactly the same way as an able bodied person. It's all down to the training. And if you've got the training it's changing attitudes on the part of personnel managers who whose job it is to find the skills they need of jobs. To me Do you really believe that industry big industry does in point of fact observe history. Oh not at all. No there's not a lot of talk. I don't think I don't think that the people that should be looking after the Bentley the interests of the nation. Yeah well the government should get to me about it. Well you know that there are roughly the motivations made but very likely to find out that somebody will be there because it was only by that design. Well if you turkey if you took the councils of the country throughout themselves could employ every disabled registry person there is between them and if they if they observed the three percent let somebody in because they set in advertising that forcing the issue forcing the figure they should do it then they got we were only talking about this yesterday. I was at a conference on access that I never had yesterday which was set up by the UM SORRY UH associate sorry. I get the terminology these various organizations muddled up but it's the disabled. It's an umbrella group yes disabled. I'll get the paperwork later and take it anyway. It's an organization to which local groups throw out sorry. You know we belong. We have in spells on these files on Joint Committee for the disabled and for the various disabled uh organizations spinal bifida multiple sclerosis Parkinson's you name it muscular dystrophy. If they wish they can send a representative to meetings and join these smells and Joint Committee for the disabled. This was formed something like 15 years ago. And so when the International Year of Disabled came came along it was nothing new to us. The idea of of having a group forming a support committee in the international year because we'd already we've already got experience of trying to cope with the needs of disabled people in this area. It's just a question of getting more publicity which which the international year gave us that that marvellous chance that I was pushing out press releases. Right left to center whenever there was anything going on that we were promoting during that year so that hopefully we were getting more and more people interested either too. We had no exhibition of AIDS for disabled people. AIDS awareness campaigns you know. And PCOS will get easier. Well it just so happened by coincidence that the inspector looking after him lived in Shepparton and I knew PCLOB was coming out of Stoke Mandeville after a year. And I said Well you know got in touch with this Inspector David Hind and said Do you think Peter Philip Filipinos will would come and open an exhibition and he did. And it was there again I think the first thing that he did publicly and he was very pleased to do it but it was quite obvious from what he said and he was absolutely honest. There's a days long. He he absolutely hated the fact that he was disabled and he admitted that he couldn't come to terms with it. But he was going to do his best. And so he was really so far because he was so honest about the problems. And that was when we got less of a publicity there of course with him coming along. Do you remember a trial where am. Designed though locally specially for paraplegics who wanted to sail single handed and It's uncapped size although unsinkable. That's another little video no little film that we made which I forgot to tell you about the challenger. But then again that resulted from the single chip foundation lobbyists are trimaran and then the director telling me of his need of a little firm to show clubs and hopefully promote it. And the Lions Club our local Lions Club here put up most of the money for it. I mean we shot that for very very little money. I mean it was a 10 day shoot to day you know that was in 1981 during the international year because we had it at the exhibition in May. And then a little bit later and we shot it on a reservoir just outside Oxford forget leave it. And Nicholas Struthers was in catamaran yes. Then Nick he ran down with his underwater. Camera the cops are very effective. Shots. Or is there a second sight on the table if you want to see section starting to get. Or if we have time now and then I think I saw that once somebody touched so many times had a nice time when you were talking you were talking about the DEA access sorry. Really I Rex's meeting yesterday. Um counting. Well we got onto that. Well you digress. Actually as I always do go round and round the subject you have nothing lined up at the moment. Well only as I say if you feel the road school which I am desperately if we don't start it soon I'm going to go out of business. No two ways about it because all the little cash has run out. And if I can't employ any secretarial help it's going to be make life very difficult not only on the firm side but on the voluntary side because producing a talky newspaper for the blind every week is a I mean I've done it every week for twelve years. Not missing one edition and that in itself is a commitment it does need a little bit of help because we're getting new listeners. We had two new ones last night. We were did the recording we do it every Thursday night at the local school. We have a team of about 50 readers so we have two male and two female readers and the young men volunteer who records it. And then I have a team of half a dozen on Friday morning to pick up the masters from me. One of the members at eight o'clock in the morning and they go along to the local day center in Staines with a handicap where we keep our high speed coffee machines we've got we just re equipped with Sony. We've got 5 5 machines. And we have to 160 copies for the rolling postal wallet and they all have to be sent out and preparing the material for the one and a half hours recording on Thursday night. Someone has to do with it. Yes that's that's how I do it with secretarial help but it's always a question of welcoming the new listeners and putting special announcements of one kind or another that we have each week and also updating the register of listeners all the time striking out those that die or move out of the area. We still well some talking use even as they move away because I like to keep in touch with local news that's going on things like that. I think it makes sense to me. I'm just wondering if there's anything else really any value to value to mention. Really and truly do you happen to know whether you are the only blind person who has had a career in the film industry. As a producer. I don't know anyone else who's uh who's done film. I don't know of a blind person who's been in the sub business and you probably know of him because he was involved with the recording studio bombs Angus Mackenzie what Olympic sound. Yes. Thank you. Speaking of signing a name I didn't realize he was fine. Thanks Ken. But I said I don't know of anyone who's been actively involved in filmmaking. Could well be in the States but I know I didn't. It's an interesting thought because I'm coming to think that what 40. What is it. Forty five years now since your accident 46 46 years since your accident. You're still involved in you know film going through a camera lenses projection sound and so on even though your involvement is different and you're not doing it as often as you'd like but none of us are. I'm afraid it does seem quite a unique achievement to me to be in the Guinness Book of Records next year your Paris ending. I just know an organization like the Getty folks at the. I get how it happened. How are the men sponsoring I support your activity making it financially stable. Well assume. Yeah. I would think it would be we'd be lucky to get involved in a movie. I think so yeah. If we had all that I think Jim Jim we would be onto him tomorrow. I'd have to be sure I can see too. Some of them realizing what I read in the paper today 70 million profit a year die for British Telecom. Central to life. Yes Jimmy I think I think it comes. I think you get to the end. Thank you thank you again.

Biographical