HP Voices


HP Voices is a collective 'online journal' consisting of all our members' blogs. (As part of full membership of the History Project, every member has the opportunity exclusive use of their own blog to write articles, essays, notes on research, or other content they may wish to share.) Please note that all opinions expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the British Entertainment History Project.

 

Author: 
M Spence

Over recent months the BECTU History Project has been busily continuing its interviews with women and men from across the UK film and television industries. With nearly 700 recordings so far, it is one of the most extensive audio-visual archives in the world. 

Recent interviews have included:-

John Henshall 

John Henshall is an acknowledged expert in electronic photography and digital imaging. He started at the BBC in the 1960s, and left in the mid-1970s. As a DoP in the following years he helped establish the new genre of music videos, and did innovative TV work such as ‘Spitting Image’ and ‘Network 7’. 

Author: 
Anonymous (not verified)

This is a copy of a magazine article from 2012 in which "Janice Turner (Editor) reviews a study by Andrew Dawson and Sean P Holmes of the development of the BECTU History Project – from a reminiscence during an ACTT conference to an internationally important  archive".

Read the original article in full here:- History Project Article SSR April-May 2012 (1113Kb PDF)

Source: Stage, Screen & Radio, 2012

 

Author: 
Mike Dick

There are many reasons why knowing our history is important, and this is particularly so for trade unionists and trade unions.

In this era of YouTube, the iPhone, 3 D movies, Facebook, ultra high definition television , the BECTU History Project links us to a time when we worked in a different way. It tells the stories of the workers in our industry over the last 100 years – it tells about the challenges they had to overcome, the skills they developed, the enduring human relationships they forged as Britain developed into one of the world’s major centres of the film and television industry.

Author: 
Simon Rose

50 Years of British TV Documentaries: A Diary of Decline, by a film editor - Simon Rose 2014

With his unique perspective of 50 years working in documentaries, Simon Rose describes the profound cultural and political changes that have transformed the genre.

 

Author: 
Ian Noah

There has been some debate in oral history circles about the merit of full transcriptions over key word summaries. Summaries may certainly be quicker, demand limited resources, and prove useful for search engines, indexing and initial research purposes. However, there can be little doubt that - when it is possible and financially viable -  a full textual rendition of an entire interview recording fundamentally and exponentially enhances the value of the recordings by providing a substantial number of additional and important benefits:-

Author: 
Anonymous (not verified)

Representatives from the History Project and BECTU welcome Kaleidoscope's recognition of the project's work. Celebrating the achievements of the History Project: l to r, Sue Malden, HP secretary, Chris Perry, Kaleidoscope, Martin Sheffield, HP committee (obscured), Roy Lockett, Roy Fowler and Martin Spence, assistant general secretary. Pic: Mark Shuttleworth.

BECTU's History Project was honoured with a Lifetime Contribution to Broadcasting award at a ceremony at BAFTA on 23 October.

The award, presented by industry organisation, Kaleidoscope, is designed to honour an individual, in any capacity e.g. writer, producer, artiste, administrator, or an organisation, operating in broadcasting for 20 years or more.